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Class Size And Class Heterogeneity

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Listed:
  • Giacomo De Giorgi
  • Michele Pellizzari
  • William Gui Woolston

Abstract

We study how class size and composition affect the academic and labor market performances of college students, two crucial policy questions given the secular increase in college enrollment. We rely on the random assignment of students to teaching classes. Our results suggest that a one standard deviation increase in the class-size would result in a 0.1 standard deviation deterioration of the average grade. Further, the effect is heterogenous as female and higher income students seem almost immune to the size of the class. Also, the effects on performance of class composition in terms of gender and ability appears to be inverse U-shaped. Finally, a reduction of 20 students (one standard deviation) in one's class size has a positive effect on monthly wages of about 80 Euros (115 USD) or 6% over the average.
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Suggested Citation

  • Giacomo De Giorgi & Michele Pellizzari & William Gui Woolston, 2012. "Class Size And Class Heterogeneity," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 10(4), pages 795-830, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jeurec:v:10:y:2012:i:4:p:795-830
    DOI: j.1542-4774.2012.01073.x
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1542-4774.2012.01073.x
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    Cited by:

    1. Braga, Michela & Paccagnella, Marco & Pellizzari, Michele, 2014. "Evaluating students’ evaluations of professors," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 71-88.
    2. Marta De Philippis, 2015. "Multitask Agents and Incentives: The Case of Teaching and Research for University Professors," CEP Discussion Papers dp1386, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    3. Giacomo De Giorgi & Michele Pellizzari, 2014. "Understanding Social Interactions: Evidence from the Classroom," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 124(579), pages 917-953, September.
    4. List, John A. & Rasul, Imran, 2011. "Field Experiments in Labor Economics," Handbook of Labor Economics, Elsevier.
    5. Stephen L. Ross & Zhentao Shi, 2016. "Measuring Social Interaction Effects when Instruments are Weak," Working papers 2016-37, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    6. Adam S. Booij & Edwin Leuven & Hessel Oosterbeek, 2017. "Ability Peer Effects in University: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 84(2), pages 547-578.
    7. Stephen L. Ross, 2009. "Social Interactions within Cities: Neighborhood Environments and Peer Relationships," Working papers 2009-31, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    8. Edmark, Karin & Frölich, Markus & Wondratschek, Verena, 2014. "Sweden's school choice reform and equality of opportunity," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 129-142.
    9. Jan Feld & Ulf Zölitz, 2017. "Understanding Peer Effects: On the Nature, Estimation, and Channels of Peer Effects," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 35(2), pages 387-428.
    10. repec:eee:ecoedu:v:58:y:2017:i:c:p:68-85 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Braga, Michela & Paccagnella, Marco & Pellizzari, Michele, 2014. "The academic and labor market returns of university professors," CEPR Discussion Papers 10283, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    12. Riphahn & Caroline Schwientek, 2015. "What drives the reversal of the gender education gap? Evidence from Germany," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(53), pages 5748-5775, November.
    13. Ulf Zölitz & Jan Feld, 2017. "The effect of peer gender on major choice," ECON - Working Papers 270, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.
    14. Martin Foureaux Koppensteiner, 2016. "Relative Age, Class Assignment and Academic Performance: Evidence from Brazilian Primary Schools," Discussion Papers in Economics 16/10, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
    15. Feld, J.F. & Zölitz, U.N., 2016. "Understanding peer effects : on the nature, estimation and channels of peer effects," ROA Research Memorandum 001, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
    16. Mateus Moreira De Souza & Isabel Raposo & Tatiane Menezes, 2018. "Is Tracking Beneficial? Study Of Tracking Using Peer Effects," Anais do XLIV Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 44th Brazilian Economics Meeting] 204, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pós-Graduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].
    17. Fu, Shihe & Viard, Brian, 2014. "Commute Costs and Labor Supply: Evidence from a Satellite Campus," MPRA Paper 53740, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    18. Ostermaier, Andreas & Beltz, Philipp & Link, Susanne, 2013. "Do university policies matter? Effects of Course Policies on Performance," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79924, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    19. Harding, Matthew & Lamarche, Carlos, 2014. "Estimating and testing a quantile regression model with interactive effects," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 178(P1), pages 101-113.
    20. Michela Braga & Marco Paccagnella & Michele Pellizzari, 2016. "The Impact of College Teaching on Students’ Academic and Labor Market Outcomes," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 34(3), pages 781-822.
    21. Nicola Bianchi, 2015. "The General Effects of Educational Expansion," Discussion Papers 15-008, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
    22. Harding, Matthew & Lamarche, Carlos, 2014. "A Hausman–Taylor instrumental variable approach to the penalized estimation of quantile panel models," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 124(2), pages 176-179.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • A22 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics - - - Undergraduate
    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • J30 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - General

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