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Imitation and Innovation Driven Development under Imperfect Intellectual Property Rights

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  • Christian Lorenczik
  • Monique Newiak

Abstract

One of the main channels through which intellectual property rights (IPRs) influence a country's economy is through their impact on innovation. However, North-South models usually constrain the South to imitative activity which generates a detrimental effect of stronger IPRs on southern welfare by construction. Further, this assumption does not account for the increasing R&D efforts in developing countries in the last decades. To study the effects of IPR protection conditional on a country's development, we present a North-South variety model which allows for original southern R&D activity and imitation specifically targeted to southern innovations. We find that the effects of IPRs depend crucially on the stage of development of a country in terms of R&D activity. In particular, we show that strengthening IPRs promotes southern R&D, increases southern real consumption and decreases the wage gap between North and South if IPRs pass a threshold level. Below this threshold, an increase in IPRs may fail to promote R&D while decreasing real consumption and wages in the South.

Suggested Citation

  • Christian Lorenczik & Monique Newiak, 2010. "Imitation and Innovation Driven Development under Imperfect Intellectual Property Rights," DEGIT Conference Papers c015_056, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.
  • Handle: RePEc:deg:conpap:c015_056
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Iwaisako, Tatsuro & Tanaka, Hitoshi, 2017. "Product cycles and growth cycles," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 22-40.
    2. Agénor, Pierre-Richard & Canuto, Otaviano, 2015. "Middle-income growth traps," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(4), pages 641-660.
    3. Theo S. Eicher & Monique Newiak, 2013. "Intellectual property rights as development determinants," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 46(1), pages 4-22, February.
    4. Agenor, Pierre-Richard & Dinh, Hinh T., 2013. "Public policy and industrial transformation in the process of development," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6405, The World Bank.
    5. Brenner, Thomas, 2015. "Science, Innovation and National Growth," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 112873, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    6. Antonio Della Malva & Enrico Santarelli, 2016. "Intellectual property rights, distance to the frontier, and R&D: evidence from microdata," Eurasian Business Review, Springer;Eurasia Business and Economics Society, vol. 6(1), pages 1-24, April.
    7. Pierre-Richard Agénor & Baris Alpaslan, 2014. "Infrastructure and Industrial Development with Endogenous Skill Acquisition," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 195, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
    8. Thomas Brenner, 2014. "Science, Innovation and National Growth," Working Papers on Innovation and Space 2014-03, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
    9. Hong Hwang & Jollene Z. Wu & Eden S. H. Yu, 2016. "Innovation, Imitation and Intellectual Property Rights in Developing Countries," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 20(1), pages 138-151, February.
    10. Banerjee, Rajabrata & Roy, Saikat Sinha, 2014. "Human capital, technological progress and trade: What explains India's long run growth?," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 15-31.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Innovation; Imitation; Economic Growth; Intellectual Property Rights;

    JEL classification:

    • F43 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Economic Growth of Open Economies
    • F55 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - International Institutional Arrangements
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • O34 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Intellectual Property and Intellectual Capital

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