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The impact of China's WTO accession on internal migration

Author

Listed:
  • Giovanni Facchini

    (University of Nottingham, CEPR, CES-Ifo, CReAM, GEP, and LdA)

  • Maggie Y. Liu

    (Georgetown University)

  • Anna Maria Mayda

    (Georgetown University, CEPR, IZA and LdA)

  • Minghai Zhou

    (University of Nottingham, Ningbo China)

Abstract

In this paper we focus on the changes in internal migration flows triggered by China’s 2001 entry into the World Trade Organization (WTO). We use a difference-in-difference empirical specification based on variation across Chinese prefectures before and after 2001. We relate changes in internal migration rates to the reduction in trade policy uncertainty faced by Chinese exporters to the U.S., as measured by the normal-trade relations (NTR) gap (Handley and Limao 2013, Pierce and Schott 2015). We find that Chinese prefectures facing a larger decline in their average NTR-gap experience a greater increase in internal migration. Our results also show that the impact on skilled and unskilled internal migration rates is consistent with the average skill intensity of export industries of a prefecture.

Suggested Citation

  • Giovanni Facchini & Maggie Y. Liu & Anna Maria Mayda & Minghai Zhou, 2017. "The impact of China's WTO accession on internal migration," Development Working Papers 422, Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano, University of Milano, revised 24 Feb 2017.
  • Handle: RePEc:csl:devewp:422
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hasan, Rana & Mitra, Devashish & Ranjan, Priya & Ahsan, Reshad N., 2012. "Trade liberalization and unemployment: Theory and evidence from India," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(2), pages 269-280.
    2. Nathan Nunn, 2007. "Relationship-Specificity, Incomplete Contracts, and the Pattern of Trade," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 122(2), pages 569-600.
    3. David H. Autor & David Dorn & Gordon H. Hanson, 2013. "The China Syndrome: Local Labor Market Effects of Import Competition in the United States," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(6), pages 2121-2168, October.
    4. Fabrice Defever & Alejandro Riaño, "undated". "China's Pure Exporter Subsidies," Discussion Papers 12/11, University of Nottingham, GEP.
    5. Trevor Tombe & Xiaodong Zhu, 2015. "Trade, Migration and Productivity: A Quantitative Analysis of China," Working Papers tecipa-542, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.
    6. Chen, Chung & Chang, Lawrence & Zhang, Yimin, 1995. "The role of foreign direct investment in China's post-1978 economic development," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 691-703, April.
    7. Benhabib, Jess, 1996. "On the political economy of immigration," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(9), pages 1737-1743, December.
    8. Facchini, Giovanni & Willmann, Gerald, 2005. "The political economy of international factor mobility," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 201-219, September.
    9. Goldberg, Pinelopi Koujianou & Pavcnik, Nina, 2005. "Trade, wages, and the political economy of trade protection: evidence from the Colombian trade reforms," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(1), pages 75-105, May.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Immigration Policy; Trade Policy; Political;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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