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Value Added Exports and U.S. Local Labor Markets: Does China Really Matter?

Author

Listed:
  • Leilei Shen

    () (Kansas State University)

  • Peri Silva

    () (Kansas State University)

Abstract

Measuring the effects of international trade on labor market outcomes has never been more im-portant given the increasing interconnections among economies around the globe. However, using measures of exposure to trade flows based on gross exports may lead to a misleading picture given that production processes have essentially become globalized, allowing firms to have access to im-ported inputs as an example. We consider the effects of international trade by building a model with firm heterogeneity where firms have the ability to offshore the production of inputs. Our model highlights that international trade offers an opportunity for firms to become more productive by en-gaging in o ff-shoring activities while they face competition from imports of final goods in the do-mestic market. We then construct a measure of U.S. exposure to Chinese goods using value added trade to analyze its effects on U.S. local labor markets. Using value added trade, we find that con-tinuously rising exports from China to the U.S. do not have significant effects on employment and wages. We further decompose the measure of exposure into value added trade in intermediate and in final goods. In line with the theoretical framework, we find that an increase in value added ex-ports from China in final goods leads to a decrease in employment across U.S. local labor markets, while the effects from a change in the exposure to trade in intermediate goods are not significant.

Suggested Citation

  • Leilei Shen & Peri Silva, "undated". "Value Added Exports and U.S. Local Labor Markets: Does China Really Matter?," Development Working Papers 373, Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano, University of Milano.
  • Handle: RePEc:csl:devewp:373
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    File URL: http://www.dagliano.unimi.it/media/WP2014_373.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Dagmara Nikulin & Joanna Wolszczak-Derlacz & Aleksandra Parteka, 2019. "Working Conditions In Global Value Chains.Evidence For European Employees," GUT FME Working Paper Series A 54, Faculty of Management and Economics, Gdansk University of Technology.
    2. Gagliardi, Nicola & Mahy, Benoît & Rycx, Francois, 2019. "Upstreamness, Wages and Gender: Equal Benefits for All?," IZA Discussion Papers 12449, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Robert C. Feenstra & Akira Sasahara, 2018. "The ‘China shock,’ exports and U.S. employment: A global input–output analysis," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 26(5), pages 1053-1083, November.
    4. Aleksandra Parteka & Joanna Wolszczak-Derlacz, 2018. "Wage Response To Global Production Links – Evidence For Workers From 28 European Countries (2005–2014)," GUT FME Working Paper Series A 51, Faculty of Management and Economics, Gdansk University of Technology.
    5. Jakubik, Adam & Stolzenburg, Victor, 2018. "The "China shock" revisited: Insights from value added trade flows," WTO Staff Working Papers ERSD-2018-10, World Trade Organization (WTO), Economic Research and Statistics Division.
    6. repec:eee:eecrev:v:111:y:2019:i:c:p:305-335 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Lake, James & Millimet, Daniel L., 2016. "Good Jobs, Bad Jobs: What's Trade Got To Do With It?," IZA Discussion Papers 9814, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    8. Sasahara, Akira, 2018. "Explaining the Employment Effect of Exports: Value-Added Content Matters," MPRA Paper 89731, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Value added exports; employment; wages;

    JEL classification:

    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations

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