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Regulating Insider Trading when Investment Matters

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  • Medrano, Luis Angel
  • Vives, Xavier

Abstract

We analyse the effects of insider trading on real investment and welfare, and the consequences of different regulatory policies: a disclose-or-abstain rule, ‘fair’ disclosure, laissez-faire and forbidding insider trades based on ‘precise’ information. We perform the analysis in a model in which all traders are rational expected-utility maximizers and aware of their position in the market. We compare the equilibrium with insider trading with the equilibrium in the same market without insider trading in two scenarios: costly and costless information acquisition. We find that with costly information acquisition an abstain-or-disclose rule tends to be optimal while with free information acquisition laissez-faire is better. This suggests enforcing an abstain-or-disclose rule with a high standard of proof for inside information. This rule of thumb advocates a laissez policy both for selective disclosure and in high-tech industries. Our approach uncovers the pitfalls of welfare analysis in the noise trader model.

Suggested Citation

  • Medrano, Luis Angel & Vives, Xavier, 2002. "Regulating Insider Trading when Investment Matters," CEPR Discussion Papers 3292, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:3292
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    Cited by:

    1. Mirman, Leonard J. & Santugini, Marc, 2013. "Firms, shareholders, and financial markets," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 53(2), pages 152-164.
    2. Giovanni Cespa & Xavier Vives, 2012. "Dynamic Trading and Asset Prices: Keynes vs. Hayek," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 79(2), pages 539-580.
    3. Kurlat, Pablo & Veldkamp, Laura, 2015. "Should we regulate financial information?," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 158(PB), pages 697-720.
    4. Giovanni Cespa, 2008. "Information Sales and Insider Trading with Long‐Lived Information," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 63(2), pages 639-672, April.
    5. Foucault, Thierry & Cespa, Giovanni, 2008. "Insiders-outsiders, transparency and the value of the ticker," HEC Research Papers Series 892, HEC Paris.
    6. Juan Jose Cruces & Enrique L. Kawamura, 2005. "Insider Trading and Corporate Governance in Latin America: A Sequential Trade Model Approach," Working Papers 86, Universidad de San Andres, Departamento de Economia, revised Dec 2005.
    7. Andrea M. Buffa & Giovanna Nicodano, 2008. "Should Insider Trading be Prohibited when Share Repurchases are Allowed?," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 12(4), pages 735-765.
    8. Vahe Lskavyan, 2015. "Insider regulation and the incentive to invest as an insider," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 16(3), pages 207-227, August.
    9. Krebs, Tom, 2005. "Fundamentals, information, and international capital flows: A welfare analysis," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(3), pages 579-598, April.
    10. Nina Boyarchenko & David O. Lucca & Laura Veldkamp, 2015. "Taking orders and taking notes: dealer information sharing in financial markets," Staff Reports 726, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    11. Xavier Vives, 2014. "Strategic Complementarity, Fragility, and Regulation," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 27(12), pages 3547-3592.
    12. Nina Boyarchenko & David O. Lucca & Laura Veldkamp, 2016. "Taking Orders and Taking Notes: Dealer Information Sharing in Treasury Markets," NBER Working Papers 22461, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Winter, Christoph, 2018. "The Impact of Heterogeneous Signals on Stock Price Predictability in a Rational Expectations Model," Working papers 2018/21, Faculty of Business and Economics - University of Basel.
    14. Carolina Manzano & Xavier Vives, 2010. "Public and Private Learning from Prices, Strategic Substitutability and Complementarity, and Equilibrium Multiplicity," CESifo Working Paper Series 3137, CESifo.
    15. Giovanni Cespa & Xavier Vives, 2009. "Dynamic Trading and Asset Prices: Keynes vs. Hayek," CESifo Working Paper Series 2839, CESifo.
    16. Dieler, T., 2014. "Essays on asset trading," Other publications TiSEM ea0c811e-e335-402f-a3e2-8, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    17. Manzano, Carolina & Vives, Xavier, 2011. "Public and private learning from prices, strategic substitutability and complementarity, and equilibrium multiplicity," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(3), pages 346-369.
    18. Lenkey, Stephen L., 2017. "Insider trading and the short-swing profit rule," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 169(C), pages 517-545.
    19. Bernhardt, Dan & Taub, Bart, 2010. "How and when is dual trading irrelevant?," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 13(2), pages 295-320, May.
    20. Maug, Ernst, 2002. "Insider trading legislation and corporate governance," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 46(9), pages 1569-1597, October.
    21. Pavan, Alessandro & Vives, Xavier, 2015. "Information, Coordination, and Market Frictions: An Introduction," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 158(PB), pages 407-426.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    disclose-or-abstain rule; hedging; insider trading selective disclosure; noise traders; real investment; speculation; welfare;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading

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