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How and when is dual trading irrelevant?

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  • Bernhardt, Dan
  • Taub, Bart

Abstract

Within a general model of speculative trade, we derive the aggregate consequences of dual traders who process retail liquidity trades and trade on their own account. We prove that dual trading reduces total expected speculator profits unless speculators process all liquidity trade and trade with the same intensity on liquidity trade. In contrast, dual trading does not affect the information content of prices. We show how results generalize when we endogenize (a) speculator information via costly information acquisition about fundamentals or costly processing of liquidity trade, and (b) liquidity trader motives and welfare via endowment shocks.

Suggested Citation

  • Bernhardt, Dan & Taub, Bart, 2010. "How and when is dual trading irrelevant?," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 13(2), pages 295-320, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:finmar:v:13:y:2010:i:2:p:295-320
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bernhardt, Dan & Taub, Bart, 2008. "Front-running dynamics," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 138(1), pages 288-296, January.
    2. Jean-Charles Rochet & Jean-Luc Vila, 1994. "Insider Trading without Normality," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 61(1), pages 131-152.
    3. Luis Angel Medran & Xavier Vives, 2004. "Regulating Insider Trading When Investment Matters," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 8(2), pages 199-277.
    4. Fishman, Michael J & Longstaff, Francis A, 1992. " Dual Trading in Futures Markets," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 47(2), pages 643-671, June.
    5. Spiegel, Matthew & Subrahmanyam, Avanidhar, 1992. "Informed Speculation and Hedging in a Noncompetitive Securities Market," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 5(2), pages 307-329.
    6. Diamond, Douglas W, 1985. " Optimal Release of Information by Firms," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 40(4), pages 1071-1094, September.
    7. Glosten, Lawrence R. & Milgrom, Paul R., 1985. "Bid, ask and transaction prices in a specialist market with heterogeneously informed traders," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 71-100, March.
    8. Kyle, Albert S, 1985. "Continuous Auctions and Insider Trading," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 53(6), pages 1315-1335, November.
    9. Sarkar Asani, 1995. "Dual Trading: Winners, Losers, and Market Impact," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 4(1), pages 77-93, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Katsumasa Nishide & Yuan Tian, 2015. "Auction versus Dealership Markets: Impact of Proprietary Trading with Transaction Fees," KIER Working Papers 922, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.

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