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Macro news, risk-free rates, and the intermediary: customer orders for thirty-year Treasury futures

  • Albert J. Menkveld
  • Asani Sarkar
  • Michel van der Wel

Customer order flow correlates with permanent price changes in equity and non-equity markets. We examine macro news events in the thirty-year Treasury futures market to identify causality from customer flow to risk-free rates. We remove the positive feedback trading effect and establish that, in the fifteen minutes subsequent to the news, intermediaries rely on customer orders to determine a substantial part of the announcement’s effect on risk-free rates—about one-third relative to the instantaneous effect. Intermediaries appear to benefit from privately observing informed customers, since their own-account trade profitability correlates with access to customer flow, controlling for volatility, competition, and the macro “surprise.”

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Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of New York in its series Staff Reports with number 307.

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Date of creation: 2007
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Handle: RePEc:fip:fednsr:307
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