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Dissimilation? The Educational Attainment of Second Generation Immigrants

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  • Riphahn, Regina

Abstract

The educational attainment of second generation immigrants is of crucial importance for their subsequent labour market success in Germany. While the schooling outcomes of natives improved in recent decades, German-born children of immigrants did not partake in this development. The Paper applies representative data from the Mikrozensus and the German Socioeconomic Panel (GSOEP) to investigate the development and determinants of educational attainment of immigrant youth. Even after controlling for covariate effects, the time trends in the educational attainment of natives and second generation immigrants deviate. This evidence for ‘dissimilation’ calls for responses by educational policy and further research attention. An additional outcome of the study is that the analysis of immigrant educational attainment ought to distinguish first and second generation immigrants as these groups differ in statistically significant ways.

Suggested Citation

  • Riphahn, Regina, 2001. "Dissimilation? The Educational Attainment of Second Generation Immigrants," CEPR Discussion Papers 2903, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:2903
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    7. Regina T. Riphahn, 2002. "Residential location and youth unemployment: The economic geography of school-to-work transitions," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 15(1), pages 115-135.
    8. Barry R. Chiswick, 1988. "Differences in Education and Earnings Across Racial and Ethnic Groups: Tastes, Discrimination, and Investments in Child Quality," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 103(3), pages 571-597.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. David Kiss, 2013. "Are immigrants and girls graded worse? Results of a matching approach," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(5), pages 447-463, December.
    2. Luthra, Renee Reichl, 2010. "Assimilation in a new context: educational attainment of the immigrant second generation in Germany," ISER Working Paper Series 2010-21, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    3. Christian Dustmann, 2008. "Return Migration, Investment in Children, and Intergenerational Mobility: Comparing Sons of Foreign- and Native-Born Fathers," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 43(2), pages 299-324.
    4. Fertig, Michael & Schmidt, Christoph M., 2001. "First- and Second-Generation Migrants in Germany - What Do We Know and What Do People Think," IZA Discussion Papers 286, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Christian Dustmann, 2002. "Arbeitsmarktverhalten, Integration und Rückkehr von Einwanderern," Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung / Quarterly Journal of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 71(2), pages 272-285.
    6. Regina T. Riphahn, 2002. "Bruttoeinkommensverteilung in Deutschland 1984 - 1999 und Ungleichheit unter ausländischen Erwerbstätigen," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 272, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    assimilation; cohort effects; educational attainment; second generation immigrants;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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