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Consumer Time Budgets and Grocery Shopping Behavior

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  • Bronnenberg, Bart
  • Klein, Tobias
  • Xu, Yan

Abstract

Home production not only requires money to buy market goods but also varying degrees of time to shop and to prepare consumption goods. Households' time budgets therefore affect their use of the market and the bundle of market goods chosen. Using a novel household panel data set that combines purchase records with time-budget shifting labor-events, and controlling for demographics, this paper shows how the availability of time affects purchasing behavior. We first find that more discretionary time, due to, e.g., retirement, leads to additional shopping trips across a more diverse set of stores, increased spending on groceries, and more diversity in products chosen. In addition, when time is less scarce, restaurant expenditures go down and grocery expenditures go up. We next classify products according to the time it takes to turn them into consumption experiences. Availability of additional time shifts a household's shopping bundle towards more time-intensive market goods. Our results suggest that product- and retail innovations aimed at forward-integrating into household production are important drivers of demand in CPG industries.

Suggested Citation

  • Bronnenberg, Bart & Klein, Tobias & Xu, Yan, 2018. "Consumer Time Budgets and Grocery Shopping Behavior," CEPR Discussion Papers 13302, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:13302
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ramey, Valerie A., 2009. "Time Spent in Home Production in the Twentieth-Century United States: New Estimates from Old Data," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 69(01), pages 1-47, March.
    2. Stéphane Caprice & Vanessa Schlippenbach, 2013. "One-Stop Shopping as a Cause of Slotting Fees: A Rent-Shifting Mechanism," Journal of Economics & Management Strategy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(3), pages 468-487, September.
    3. Georg Duernecker & Berthold Herrendorf, 2015. "On the Allocation of Time - A Quantitative Analysis of the U.S. and France," CESifo Working Paper Series 5475, CESifo Group Munich.
    4. Øyvind Thomassen & Howard Smith & Stephan Seiler & Pasquale Schiraldi, 2017. "Multi-category Competition and Market Power: A Model of Supermarket Pricing," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(8), pages 2308-2351, August.
    5. Baye, Irina & von Schlippenbach, Vanessa & Wey, Christian, 2017. "One-stop shopping behavior, buyer power, and upstream merger incentives," DICE Discussion Papers 27, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE).
    6. Roger R. Betancourt, 2004. "The Economics of Retailing and Distribution," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 3511.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    consumer purchase behavior; Household production; retirement; time use;

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • M31 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Marketing and Advertising - - - Marketing

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