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Town and city jobs: Your job is different in another location

  • Suzanne Kok

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    This CPB Discussion Paper shows that a job contains a different task package in a large city than the same job in a small city. We set out a theoretical model of the division of labour across cities, which shows that both the division of labour and the skill demand increase with city size. Most datasets hinder an empirical analysis of such a model as they lack spatial variation in job content. Using individual German task data, we are able to empirically estimate our model and analyse spatial variations in task content of jobs. The estimations support the predictions of the model: jobs in large cities consist of other task packages than the same jobs in small cities. Workers in large cities focus more on their core tasks and perform fewer subtasks than workers in small cities. Jobs demand more cognitive skills when they are performed in large cities. This spatial variation in job contents likely bias regional wage equations.

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    File URL: http://www.cpb.nl/sites/default/files/publicaties/download/cpb-discussion-paper-246-town-and-city-jobs-your-job-different-another-location.pdf
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    Paper provided by CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis in its series CPB Discussion Paper with number 246.

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    Date of creation: Jun 2013
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    Handle: RePEc:cpb:discus:246
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    4. Marigee Bacolod & Bernardo S. Blum & William C. Strange, 2010. "Elements Of Skill: Traits, Intelligences, Education, And Agglomeration," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(1), pages 245-280.
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    9. repec:iab:iabjlr:v:46:i:3:p:185-199 is not listed on IDEAS
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    17. Alexandra Spitz-Oener, 2006. "Technical Change, Job Tasks, and Rising Educational Demands: Looking outside the Wage Structure," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 24(2), pages 235-270, April.
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    21. Jan Eeckhout & Roberto Pinheiro & Kurt Schmidheiny, 2010. "Spatial Sorting: Why New York, Los Angeles and DetroitAttract the Greatest Minds as well as the Unskilled," CESifo Working Paper Series 3274, CESifo Group Munich.
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