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The Impact of Receiving Price and Climate Information in the Agricultural Sector

Author

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  • Adriana Camacho
  • Emily Conover
  • econover@hamilton.edu

Abstract

Previous studies indicate that Colombian farmers make production decisions based on informal sources of information, such as family and neighbors or tradition. In this paper we randomize recipients of price and climate information using text messages (SMS technology). Under this experimental design we find that relative to those farmers who did not receive SMS information, the farmers that did had better knowledge of prices and the dispersion in the expected price of their crops was narrower, although we do not see a significant difference in the actual sale price. Farmers also report that text message information is useful and becomes an important source of information for sales. Even though we find significant reduction in crop loss in general and due to weather conditions, we do not find significant changes in their revenues or householdexpenditures.

Suggested Citation

  • Adriana Camacho & Emily Conover & econover@hamilton.edu, 2010. "The Impact of Receiving Price and Climate Information in the Agricultural Sector," Documentos CEDE 007907, Universidad de los Andes – Facultad de Economía – CEDE.
  • Handle: RePEc:col:000089:007907
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Emily Oster & Rebecca Thornton, 2009. "Determinants of Technology Adoption: Private Value and Peer Effects in Menstrual Cup Take-Up," NBER Working Papers 14828, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Arimoto, Yutaka & Kono, Hisaki & Ralandison, Tsilavo & Sakurai, Takeshi & Takahashi, Kazushi, 2015. "Understanding traders' regional arbitage : the case of rice traders in Antananarivo, Madagascar," IDE Discussion Papers 505, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
    2. Hillen, Judith, 2018. "Web Scraping For Food Price Research," 58th Annual Conference, Kiel, Germany, September 12-14, 2018 275840, German Association of Agricultural Economists (GEWISOLA).
    3. Van Campenhout, Bjorn, 2013. "Is there an App for that? The impact of community knowledge workers in Uganda:," IFPRI discussion papers 1316, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Eduardo Nakasone & Maximo Torero, 2016. "A text message away: ICTs as a tool to improve food security," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 47(S1), pages 49-59, November.
    5. Hernan Galperin & M. Fernanda Viecens, 2017. "Connected for Development? Theory and evidence about the impact of Internet technologies on poverty alleviation," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 35(3), pages 315-336, May.
    6. Aker, Jenny C. & Ksoll, Christopher, 2016. "Can mobile phones improve agricultural outcomes? Evidence from a randomized experiment in Niger," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 44-51.
    7. Zhao, Jianmei, 2018. "Internet access and rural household income in China," 2018 Annual Meeting, August 5-7, Washington, D.C. 274178, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    8. Palloni, G. & Aker, J. & Gilligan, D. & Hidrobo, M. & Ledlie, N., 2018. "Paying for Digital Information: Assessing Farmers Willingness to Pay for a Digital Agriculture and Nutrition Service in Ghana," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 277451, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    9. Kamiche Zegarra, J. & Bravo-Ureta, B., 2018. "Are users of market information efficient? A stochastic production frontier model corrected by sample selection," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 275870, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    10. Brooks, Karen & Zorya, Sergiy & Gautam, Amy & Goyal, Aparajita, 2013. "Agriculture as a sector of opportunity for young people in Africa," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6473, The World Bank.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Randomized evaluation; price and climate information in agriculture; bargaining; spillovers; SMS technology;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D62 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Externalities
    • Q11 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Aggregate Supply and Demand Analysis; Prices
    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets
    • Q13 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Markets and Marketing; Cooperatives; Agribusiness

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