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Employment Protection and Business Cycles in Emerging Economies

Author

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  • Ruy Lama

    () (International Monetary Fund)

  • Carlos Urrutia

    () (Centro de Investigacion Economica (CIE), Instituto Tecnologico Autonomo de Mexico (ITAM))

Abstract

We build a small open economy, real business cycle model with labor market frictions to evaluate the role of employment protection in shaping business cycles in emerging economies. The model features matching frictions and an endogenous selection effect by which inefficient jobs are destroyed in recessions. In a quantitative version of the model calibrated to the Mexican economy we find that reducing separation costs to a level consistent with developed economies would reduce output volatility by 15 percent. We also use the model to analyze the Mexican crisis episode of 2008 and conclude that an economy with lower separation costs would have experienced a smaller drop in output and in measured total factor productivity with no significant change in aggregate employment.

Suggested Citation

  • Ruy Lama & Carlos Urrutia, 2011. "Employment Protection and Business Cycles in Emerging Economies," Working Papers 1105, Centro de Investigacion Economica, ITAM.
  • Handle: RePEc:cie:wpaper:1105
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    Cited by:

    1. Sangeeta Pratap & Carlos Urrutia, 2012. "Financial Frictions and Total Factor Productivity: Accounting for the Real Effects of Financial Crises," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 15(3), pages 336-358, July.
    2. Andrés Fernández & Felipe Meza, 2011. "Labor, Output and Consumption in Business Cycle Models of Emerging Economies: A Comment," DOCUMENTOS CEDE 009249, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE.
    3. Andres Fernandez & Juan Herreno, 2013. "Equilibrium Unemployment during Financial Crises," Research Department Publications IDB-WP-390, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    4. Andres Fernandez & Felipe Meza, 2015. "Informal Employment and Business Cycles in Emerging Economies: The Case of Mexico," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 18(2), pages 381-405, April.
    5. Alan Finkelstein-Shapiro & Miguel Sarzosa, 2012. "Unemployement Protection for Informal Workers in Latin America and the Caribbean," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 4542, Inter-American Development Bank.
    6. Craighead, William D., 2014. "Monetary rules and sectoral unemployment in open economies," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 277-292.

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