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The Impact of the Minimum Wage on Capital Accumulation and Employment in a Large-Firm Framework

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  • Sofia Bauducco
  • Alexandre Janiak

Abstract

We study the effect of a binding minimum wage on labor market outcomes, the accumulation of capital and welfare. We consider a large firm that invests in physical capital and hires several types of workers. Labor markets are characterized by search and matching frictions, while incomplete wage contracts allow workers to appropriate part of the return on each factor. Absent a minimum wage, the model in general gives rise to inefficient levels of capital and employment. We show that, when labor types are substitutes, the introduction of a binding minimum wage has positive effects on capital and positive and small effects on employment, and these effects depend on the ability of the minimum wage to deter rent appropriation by workers.

Suggested Citation

  • Sofia Bauducco & Alexandre Janiak, 2015. "The Impact of the Minimum Wage on Capital Accumulation and Employment in a Large-Firm Framework," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 755, Central Bank of Chile.
  • Handle: RePEc:chb:bcchwp:755
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David, Quentin & Janiak, Alexandre & Wasmer, Etienne, 2010. "Local social capital and geographical mobility," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 191-204, September.
    2. Francesco Caselli & James Feyrer, 2007. "The Marginal Product of Capital," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 122(2), pages 535-568.
    3. Lars A. Stole & Jeffrey Zwiebel, 1996. "Intra-firm Bargaining under Non-binding Contracts," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 63(3), pages 375-410.
    4. Robert E. Hall & Charles I. Jones, 1999. "Why do Some Countries Produce So Much More Output Per Worker than Others?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(1), pages 83-116.
    5. William Hawkins, 2015. "Bargaining with Commitment Between Workers and Large Firms," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 18(2), pages 350-364, April.
    6. Janiak, Alexandre, 2013. "Structural unemployment and the costs of firm entry and exit," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(C), pages 1-19.
    7. Cardoso, Ana Rute & Portugal, Pedro, 2001. "Disentangling the Minimum Wage Puzzle: An Analysis of Job Accessions and Separations from a Longitudinal Matched Employer-Employee Data Set," CEPR Discussion Papers 2844, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. David S. Lee, 1999. "Wage Inequality in the United States During the 1980s: Rising Dispersion or Falling Minimum Wage?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(3), pages 977-1023.
    9. Arthur J. Hosios, 1990. "On The Efficiency of Matching and Related Models of Search and Unemployment," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 57(2), pages 279-298.
    10. Burkhauser, Richard V & Couch, Kenneth A & Wittenburg, David C, 2000. "A Reassessment of the New Economics of the Minimum Wage Literature with Monthly Data from the Current Population Survey," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 18(4), pages 653-680, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sofía Bauducco & Alexandre Janiak, 2015. "On the welfare cost of bank concentration," Documentos de Trabajo 321, Centro de Economía Aplicada, Universidad de Chile.
    2. Sofia Bauducco & Alexandre Janiak, 2015. "Can a Non-Binding Minimum Wage Reduce Wages and Employment?," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 756, Central Bank of Chile.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs
    • J68 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Public Policy
    • L20 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - General

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