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More than an Urban Legend: The long-term socioeconomic effects of unplanned fertility shocks

Author

Listed:
  • Fetzer, Thiemo

    (University of Warwick)

  • Pardo, Oliver

    (Universidad Icesi)

  • Shanghavi, Amar

    (London School of Economics)

Abstract

This paper exploits a nearly year-long period of power rationing that took place in Colombia in 1992, to shed light on three interrelated questions. First, we show that power shortages can lead to higher fertility, causing mini baby booms. Second, we show that the increase in fertility had not been offset by having fewer children over the following 12 years. Third, we show that the fertility shock caused mothers worse socioeconomic outcomes 12 years later. Taken together, the results suggest that there are significant indirect social costs to poor public infrastructure.

Suggested Citation

  • Fetzer, Thiemo & Pardo, Oliver & Shanghavi, Amar, 2016. "More than an Urban Legend: The long-term socioeconomic effects of unplanned fertility shocks," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 284, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
  • Handle: RePEc:cge:wacage:284
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    File URL: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/economics/research/centres/cage/manage/publications/284-2016_fetzer.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    fertility; infrastructure; blackouts; unplanned parenthood. JEL Classification: J13; J16; O18; H41;

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure
    • H41 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Public Goods

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