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Where Will the World’s Poor Live? An Update on Global Poverty and the New Bottom Billion

  • Andy Sumner
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    This paper updates the distribution of global poverty data and makes projections up to 2020. The paper asks the following question: Do the world’s extreme poor live in poor countries? It is argued that many of the world’s extreme poor already live in countries where the total cost of ending extreme poverty is not prohibitively high as a percentage of GDP. And in the not-too-distant future, most of the world’s poor will live in countries that do have the domestic financial scope to end at least extreme poverty. This would imply a reframing of global poverty as largely a matter of domestic distribution.

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    File URL: http://www.cgdev.org/files/1426481_file_Sumner_where_in_the_world_FINAL.pdf
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    Paper provided by Center for Global Development in its series Working Papers with number 305.

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    Length: 33 pages
    Date of creation: Sep 2012
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:cgd:wpaper:305
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.cgdev.org

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