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Do Poorer Countries Have Less Capacity for Redistribution?

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  • Ravallion Martin

    (World Bank)

Abstract

Development aid and policy discussions often assume that poorer countries have less internal capacity for redistribution in favor of their poorest citizens. The assumption is tested for 90 developing countries. Most countries fall into one of two groups: those with little or no realistic prospect of addressing extreme poverty through redistribution from the rich and those that would appear to have ample scope for such redistribution. Economic growth tends to move countries from the first group to the second. Thus the appropriate balance between growth and redistribution strategies can be seen to depend on the level of economic development.

Suggested Citation

  • Ravallion Martin, 2010. "Do Poorer Countries Have Less Capacity for Redistribution?," Journal of Globalization and Development, De Gruyter, vol. 1(2), pages 1-31, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:globdv:v:1:y:2010:i:2:n:1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Bénédicte Fonteneau & Jan Van Ongevalle, 2015. "Redistributive Social Protection. Mapping Study," BeFinD Working Papers 0101, University of Namur, Department of Economics.
    2. Miguel Niño-Zarazúa & Armando Barrientos & David Hulme & Sam Hickey, 2010. "Social protection in sub-Saharan Africa: Will the green shoots blossom?," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series 11610, GDI, The University of Manchester.
    3. d'Agostino, Giorgio & Scarlato, Margherita, 2011. "Innovation, Growth and Quality of Life: a Theoretical Model and an Estimate for the Italian Regions," MPRA Paper 31939, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Andy Sumner, 2012. "Where Will the World’s Poor Live? An Update on Global Poverty and the New Bottom Billion," Working Papers 305, Center for Global Development.
    5. Gentilini, Ugo & Omamo, Steven Were, 2011. "Social protection 2.0: Exploring issues, evidence and debates in a globalizing world," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 329-340, June.
    6. Hadi Esfahani & Seyed Karimi, 2014. "The Distributional Consequences of Economic Growth and Public Spending Programs in Iran," Working Papers 891, Economic Research Forum, revised Dec 2014.
    7. Parcero, Osiris J. & Papyrakis, Elissaios, 2016. "Income inequality and the oil resource curse," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 159-177.
    8. Kalle Hirvonen & Giulia Mascagni & Keetie Roelen, 2016. "Linking taxation and social protection Evidence on redistribution and poverty reduction in Ethiopia," WIDER Working Paper Series 111, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    9. Stefan Dercon, 2014. "Climate change, green growth, and aid allocation to poor countries," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 30(3), pages 531-549.
    10. Andy Sumner, 2012. "The Buoyant Billions: How “Middle Class†Are the New Middle Classes in Developing Countries? (And Why Does It Matter?)," Working Papers id:5169, eSocialSciences.
    11. Gassmann, Franziska & Mohnen, Pierre & Vinci, Vincenzo, 2016. "Institutional factors and people's preferences in social protection," MERIT Working Papers 003, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    12. Sumner, Andy, 2012. "Where Do The Poor Live?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(5), pages 865-877.
    13. Stefan Dercon, 2014. "Climate change, green growth, and aid allocation to poor countries," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 30(3), pages 531-549.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F35 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Aid
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty

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