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Where Do The Poor Live?

  • Sumner, Andy
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    This paper argues that the distribution of global poverty has changed and that most of the world’s poor no longer live in countries officially classified as low-income countries (LICs). It is estimated that the majority of the world’s poor, or up to a billion people, live in middle-income countries (MICs). This pattern is largely as a result of the recent graduation into the MIC category of a number of populous countries. The paper discusses the trends in the distribution of global poverty, and opens a wider discussion on the potential implications for aid and development cooperation.

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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal World Development.

    Volume (Year): 40 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 5 ()
    Pages: 865-877

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:40:y:2012:i:5:p:865-877
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    1. Martin Ravallion, 2011. "Do Poorer Countries Have Less Capacity for Redistribution?," One Pager Chinese 97, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.
    2. Dollar, David & Alesina, Alberto, 2000. "Who Gives Foreign Aid to Whom and Why?," Scholarly Articles 4553020, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    3. Edward Anderson & Hugh Waddington, 2007. "Aid and the Millennium Development Goal Poverty Target: How Much is Required and How Should it be Allocated?," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(1), pages 1-31.
    4. Baulch, Bob, 2006. "Aid distribution and the MDGs," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 34(6), pages 933-950, June.
    5. Kenneth Harttgen & Stephan Klasen, 2010. "Fragility and MDG Progress: How useful is the Fragility Concept?," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 41, Courant Research Centre PEG.
    6. Angus Deaton & Alan Heston, 2010. "Understanding PPPs and PPP-Based National Accounts," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(4), pages 1-35, October.
    7. World Bank, 2010. "World Development Indicators 2010," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 4373.
    8. Wood, Adrian, 2008. "Looking Ahead Optimally in Allocating Aid," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(7), pages 1135-1151, July.
    9. Angus Deaton, 2010. "Price Indexes, Inequality, and the Measurement of World Poverty," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(1), pages 5-34, March.
    10. Charles Kenny, 2008. "What is effective aid? How would donors allocate it?," The European Journal of Development Research, Taylor and Francis Journals, vol. 20(2), pages 330-346.
    11. Oecd, 2002. "Aid volume, channels and allocations for poverty reduction," OECD Journal on Development, OECD Publishing, vol. 3(3), pages 33-46.
    12. Kanbur, Ravi & Sumner, Andy, 2011. "Poor Countries or Poor People? Development Assistance and the New Geography of Global Poverty," CEPR Discussion Papers 8489, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    13. Owen Barder, 2009. "What is Poverty Reduction?," Working Papers 170, Center for Global Development.
    14. Ravi Kanbur, 2006. "Poverty, Relative to the Ability to Eradicate It: An Index of Poverty Reduction Failure," Working Papers id:714, eSocialSciences.
    15. Chen, Shaohua & Ravallion, Martin, 2008. "The developing world is poorer than we thought, but no less successful in the fight against poverty," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4703, The World Bank.
    16. Todd Moss and Ben Leo, 2011. "IDA at 65: Heading Toward Retirement or a Fragile Lease on Life? - Working Paper 246," Working Papers 246, Center for Global Development.
    17. Dollar, David & Levin, Victoria, 2006. "The Increasing Selectivity of Foreign Aid, 1984-2003," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 34(12), pages 2034-2046, December.
    18. Paul Clist, . "25 Years of Aid Allocation Practice: Comparing Donors and Eras," Discussion Papers 09/11, University of Nottingham, CREDIT.
    19. Branchflower, Andrew & Hennell, Sarah & Pongracz, Sophie & Smart, Malcolm, 2004. "How Important Are Difficult Environments To Achieving The Mdgs?," PRDE Working Papers 12821, Department for International Development (DFID) (UK).
    20. Andy Sumner, 2010. "Global Poverty and the New Bottom Billion: Three-Quarters of the World?s Poor Live in Middle-Income Countries," One Pager 120, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.
    21. Collier, Paul & Dollar, David, 1999. "Aid allocation and poverty reduction," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2041, The World Bank.
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