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Poverty Where People Live: What do National Poverty Lines Tell us about Global Poverty?

Author

Listed:
  • Ugo Gentilini

    () (World Food Programme)

  • Andy Sumner

    () (Institute of Development Studies, Sussex)

Abstract

Debate about national and international poverty measurement continued to evolve (see for example, Abu-Ismail et al., 2012). The basic question of how many poor people there are in the world generally assumes that poverty is measured according to international poverty lines (IPLs). Yet, an equally relevant question could be how many poor people there are in the world, based on how poverty is defined where those people live. In short, rather than a comparison based on monetary values, the latter question is germane to estimates based on a concept??poverty??as defined by countries? specific circumstances and institutions. (?)

Suggested Citation

  • Ugo Gentilini & Andy Sumner, 2012. "Poverty Where People Live: What do National Poverty Lines Tell us about Global Poverty?," Working Papers 98, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.
  • Handle: RePEc:ipc:wpaper:98
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    File URL: http://www.ipc-undp.org/pub/IPCWorkingPaper98.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Gentilini, Ugo & Omamo, Steven Were, 2011. "Social protection 2.0: Exploring issues, evidence and debates in a globalizing world," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 329-340, June.
    2. Coleman-Jensen, Alisha & Nord, Mark & Andrews, Margaret S. & Carlson, Steven, 2011. "Household Food Security in the United States in 2010," Economic Research Report 118021, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    3. Angus Deaton, 2010. "Price Indexes, Inequality, and the Measurement of World Poverty," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(1), pages 5-34, March.
    4. Kanbur, Ravi & Sumner, Andy, 2011. "Poor Countries or Poor People? Development Assistance and the New Geography of Global Poverty," CEPR Discussion Papers 8489, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Martin Ravallion & Shaohua Chen, 2011. "Weakly Relative Poverty," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(4), pages 1251-1261, November.
    6. Khalid Abu-Ismail & Gihan Abou Taleb & Racha Ramadan, 2012. "Rethinking Global Poverty Measurement," Working Papers 93, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.
    7. Gentilini, Ugo & Webb, Patrick, 2008. "How are we doing on poverty and hunger reduction? A new measure of country performance," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 521-532, December.
    8. Shaohua Chen & Martin Ravallion, 2010. "The Developing World is Poorer than We Thought, But No Less Successful in the Fight Against Poverty," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 125(4), pages 1577-1625.
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    Cited by:

    1. Facundo Alvaredo & Leonardo Gasparini, 2013. "Recent Trends in Inequality and Poverty in Developing Countries," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0151, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.

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    Poverty Where People Live: What do National Poverty Lines Tell us about Global Poverty?;

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