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Ownership concentration in Russian industry

Author

Listed:
  • Sergei Guriev

    () (New Economic School/CEFIR and CERP)

  • Andrei Rachinsky

    () (CEFIR)

Abstract

Using a unique dataset built for the World Bank’s Country Economic Memorandum, we find that a relatively small number of tycoons ('oligarchs') control a substantial share of Russia’s economy. Oligarchs seem to run their empires more efficiently than other Russian owners. While the relative weight of their firms in Russian economy is huge, they do not seem to be excessively large by the standards of the global economy where most of them are operating. However, a majority of the Russian population deems their property rights illegitimate, which creates a fundamental problem for building a democratic and prosperous Russia.

Suggested Citation

  • Sergei Guriev & Andrei Rachinsky, 2004. "Ownership concentration in Russian industry," Working Papers w0045, Center for Economic and Financial Research (CEFIR).
  • Handle: RePEc:cfr:cefirw:w0045
    as

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    File URL: http://www.cefir.ru/papers/WP45_OwnershipConcentration.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:rujoec:v:2:y:2016:i:2:p:162-191 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Ichiro Iwasaki, 2007. "Enterprise Reform And Corporate Governance In Russia: A Quantitative Survey," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(5), pages 849-902, December.
    3. repec:taf:pocoec:v:30:y:2018:i:3:p:290-333 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Aidis, Ruta & Adachi, Yuko, 2007. "Russia: Firm entry and survival barriers," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 391-411, December.
    5. Pertti Haaparanta & Tuuli Juurikkala & Olga Lazareva & Jukka Pirttila & Laura Solanko & Ekaterina Zhuravskaya, 2003. "Firms And Public Service Provision In Russia," Working Papers w0041, Center for Economic and Financial Research (CEFIR).
    6. Ichiro Iwasaki & Satoshi Mizobata & Alexander Muravyev, 2018. "Ownership dynamics and firm performance in an emerging economy: a meta-analysis of the Russian literature," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(3), pages 290-333, May.
    7. repec:hrv:faseco:33078568 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Sergei Guriev & Andrei Rachinsky, 2005. "The Role of Oligarchs in Russian Capitalism," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 19(1), pages 131-150, Winter.
    9. Iwasaki, Ichiro & Maurel, Mathilde & Meunier, Bogdan, 2016. "Firm entry and exit during a crisis period: Evidence from Russian regions," Russian Journal of Economics, Elsevier, vol. 2(2), pages 162-191.
    10. Farrukh Suvankulov & Fatma Ogucu, 2012. "Have firms with better corporate governance fared better during the recent financial crisis in Russia?," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(8), pages 769-773, May.
    11. Andrei Shleifer & Daniel Treisman, 2005. "A Normal Country: Russia After Communism," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 19(1), pages 151-174, Winter.
    12. Olga Lazareva & Andrei Rachinsky & Sergey Stepanov, 2007. "A Survey of Corporate Governance in Russia," Working Papers w0103, Center for Economic and Financial Research (CEFIR).
    13. Ruta Aidis & Yuko Adachi, 2006. "Russia: firm entry and survival," UCL SSEES Economics and Business working paper series 67, UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES).
    14. Peter Rutland, 2013. "Neoliberalism and the Russian transition," Review of International Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(2), pages 332-362, April.
    15. Estrin, Saul & Prevezer, Martha, 2010. "A survey on institutions and new firm entry: How and why do entry rates differ in emerging markets?," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 289-308, September.

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