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The Cost of Human Capital Depreciation during Unemployment

  • Lien Laureys

    ()

    (Bank of England)

Skill erosion during unemployment was of particular concern as unemployment duration increased in the Great Recession. I argue that it generates an externality in job creation: firms ignore how their hiring decisions affect the unemployment pool’s skill composition, and hence the expected output produced by new hires. As a consequence, job creation is too low from a social point of view. But the extent to which it is too low varies over the cycle. This is because the externality’s magnitude, which depends on the impact of job creation on the pool’s skill composition, reduces when the share of unemployed workers who already have eroded skills increases.

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File URL: http://www.centreformacroeconomics.ac.uk/Discussion-Papers/2014/CFMDP2014-20-Paper.pdf
File Function: First version, 2014
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Paper provided by Centre for Macroeconomics (CFM) in its series Discussion Papers with number 1420.

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Length: 60 pages
Date of creation: Jul 2014
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cfm:wpaper:1420
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.centreformacroeconomics.ac.uk/

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  1. Tomaz Cajner & Isabel Cairo, 2011. "Human Capital and Unemployment Dynamics: Why More Educated Workers Enjoy Greater Employment Stability," 2011 Meeting Papers 1145, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  2. Lien Laureys, 2014. "Optimal monetary policy in the presence of human capital depreciation during unemployment," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 58006, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  3. Stevens, Ann Huff, 1997. "Persistent Effects of Job Displacement: The Importance of Multiple Job Losses," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 15(1), pages 165-88, January.
  4. Dale T. Mortensen & Christopher A. Pissarides, 1994. "Job Creation and Job Destruction in the Theory of Unemployment," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 61(3), pages 397-415.
  5. Robert Shimer & Iván Werning, 2006. "On the Optimal Timing of Benefits with Heterogeneous Workers and Human Capital Depreciation," NBER Working Papers 12230, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Ken Burdett & Melvyn G. Coles, 1997. "Marriage and Class," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(1), pages 141-168.
  7. Coles, Melvyn & Masters, Adrian, 2000. "Retraining and long-term unemployment in a model of unlearning by not doing," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 44(9), pages 1801-1822, October.
  8. Christopher A. Pissarides, 1992. "Loss of Skill During Unemployment and the Persistence of Employment Shocks," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(4), pages 1371-1391.
  9. Nicola Pavoni, 2009. "Optimal Unemployment Insurance, With Human Capital Depreciation, And Duration Dependence," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 50(2), pages 323-362, 05.
  10. James Albrecht & Lucas Navarro & Susan Vroman, 2009. "Efficiency in a Search and Matching Model with Endogenous Participation," ILADES-Georgetown University Working Papers inv218, Ilades-Georgetown University, Universidad Alberto Hurtado/School of Economics and Bussines.
  11. Victor Ortego-Marti, 2014. "Unemployment History and Frictional Wage Dispersion," Working Papers 201402, University of California at Riverside, Department of Economics.
  12. Johannes F. Schmieder & Till von Wachter & Stefan Bender, 2013. "The Causal Effect of Unemployment Duration on Wages: Evidence from Unemployment Insurance Extensions," NBER Working Papers 19772, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Kory Kroft & Fabian Lange & Matthew J. Notowidigdo, 2013. "Duration Dependence and Labor Market Conditions: Evidence from a Field Experiment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 128(3), pages 1123-1167.
  14. Ljungqvist, Lars & Sargent, Thomas J., 2007. "Understanding European unemployment with matching and search-island models," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(8), pages 2139-2179, November.
  15. Julen Esteban-Pretel & Elisa Faraglia, 2010. "Monetary Shocks in a Model with Skill Loss," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 42(7), pages 1235-1265, October.
  16. Addison, John T & Portugal, Pedro, 1989. "Job Displacement, Relative Wage Changes, and Duration of Unemployment," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 7(3), pages 281-302, July.
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