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Optimal monetary policy in the presence of human capital depreciation during unemployment

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  • Laureys, Lien

Abstract

When workers are exposed to human capital depreciation during periods of unemployment, hiring affects the unemployment pool’s composition in terms of skills, and hence the economy’s production potential. Introducing human capital depreciation during unemployment into an otherwise standard New Keynesian model with search frictions in the labour market leads to the finding that the flexibleprice allocation is no longer constrained-efficient even when the standard Hosios (1990) condition holds. This is because it generates a composition externality in job creation: firms ignore how their hiring decisions affect the extent to which the unemployed workers’ skills erode, and hence the output that can be produced by new matches. Consequently, it might be desirable from a social point of view for monetary policy to deviate from strict inflation targeting. Although optimal price inflation is no longer zero, strict inflation targeting is shown to stay close to the optimal policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Laureys, Lien, 2014. "Optimal monetary policy in the presence of human capital depreciation during unemployment," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 58006, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:58006
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Laureys, Lien, 2014. "The cost of human capital depreciation during unemployment," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 86337, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Addison, John T & Portugal, Pedro, 1989. "Job Displacement, Relative Wage Changes, and Duration of Unemployment," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 7(3), pages 281-302, July.
    3. Faia, Ester, 2009. "Ramsey monetary policy with labor market frictions," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(4), pages 570-581, May.
    4. Federico Ravenna & Carl E. Walsh, 2011. "Welfare-Based Optimal Monetary Policy with Unemployment and Sticky Prices: A Linear-Quadratic Framework," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(2), pages 130-162, April.
    5. Julen Esteban-Pretel & Elisa Faraglia, 2005. "Monetary Shocks in a Model with Loss of Skills," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-380, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
    6. Johannes F. Schmieder & Till von Wachter & Stefan Bender, 2013. "The Causal Effect of Unemployment Duration on Wages: Evidence from Unemployment Insurance Extensions," NBER Working Papers 19772, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Ravenna, Federico & Walsh, Carl E., 2012. "Monetary policy and labor market frictions: A tax interpretation," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(2), pages 180-195.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ortego-Marti, Victor, 2017. "Differences in skill loss during unemployment across industries and occupations," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 161(C), pages 31-33.
    2. Laureys, Lien, 2014. "The cost of human capital depreciation during unemployment," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 86337, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Sushant Acharya & Julien Bengui & Keshav Dogra & Shu Lin Wee, 2017. "Slow recoveries and unemployment traps: monetary policy in a time of hysteresis," Staff Reports 831, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    4. Sterk, Vincent, 2016. "The dark corners of the labor market," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 86244, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    5. Abdoulaye Millogo & Jean-François Rouillard, 2019. "Missing Disinflation and Human Capital Depreciation," Cahiers de recherche 19-03, Departement d'Economique de l'École de gestion à l'Université de Sherbrooke, revised Oct 2020.
    6. Angelopoulos, Konstantinos & Jiang, Wei & Malley, James, 2015. "Fiscal multipliers in a two-sector search and matching model," SIRE Discussion Papers 2015-67, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
    7. Vincent Sterk, 2015. "The Dark Corners of the Labor Market," 2015 Meeting Papers 798, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    8. Prein, Timm, 2019. "Persistent Unemployment, Sovereign Debt Crises, and the Impact of Haircuts," VfS Annual Conference 2019 (Leipzig): 30 Years after the Fall of the Berlin Wall - Democracy and Market Economy 203654, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    9. Ross Doppelt, 2019. "Skill Flows: A Theory of Human Capital and Unemployment," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 31, pages 84-122, January.
    10. Vincent Sterk, 2016. "The Dark Corners of the Labor Market," Discussion Papers 1603, Centre for Macroeconomics (CFM).
    11. Sushant Acharya & Julien Bengui & Keshav Dogra & Shu Lin Wee, 2016. "Escaping Unemployment Traps," Liberty Street Economics 20161116, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • N0 - Economic History - - General
    • R14 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Land Use Patterns
    • J01 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics: General
    • F3 - International Economics - - International Finance
    • G3 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance

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