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The Brexit as a Forerunner: Monetary Policy, Economic Order and Divergence Forces in the European Union

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  • Sebastian Müller
  • Gunther Schnabl

Abstract

We analyze the effects of the increasingly expansionary monetary policies on the economic order and on the European integration process. We argue that the market orders shaped in postwar Germany and in Margret Thatcher’s United Kingdom have long served as cornerstones for growth, prosperity and social cohesion in Europe. It is shown that the monetary policies of the European Central Bank and the Bank of England have undermined these orders, thereby eroding productivity gains and growth. Combined with negative distribution effects, ultra-loose monetary policies constitute the breeding ground for divergence forces in the European Union as heralded by the Brexit.

Suggested Citation

  • Sebastian Müller & Gunther Schnabl, 2018. "The Brexit as a Forerunner: Monetary Policy, Economic Order and Divergence Forces in the European Union," CESifo Working Paper Series 6938, CESifo Group Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_6938
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    European integration; economic order; Walter Eucken; Friedrich August von Hayek; Margret Thatcher; inequality; monetary policy; political polarization; divergence; Brexit;

    JEL classification:

    • B25 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought since 1925 - - - Historical; Institutional; Evolutionary; Austrian; Stockholm School
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • E65 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Studies of Particular Policy Episodes

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