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Integrated Public Education, Fertility and Human Capital

  • Leonid V. Azarnert

This article analyzes the consequences of integration in public education. I show that the flight from the integrated multicultural public schools to private education increases private educational expenditures and, as a result, decreases fertility among more affluent parents whose children flee. In contrast, among less prosperous parents, integration in public education decreases their children’s human capital levels. I demonstrate that the poor, who cannot opt out, incur greater costs than the rich, who can resort to private education. I also analyze the overall society-wide effect of the integration policy and derive a condition that determines precisely whether this policy increases or decreases the average level of human capital in society.

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Paper provided by CESifo Group Munich in its series CESifo Working Paper Series with number 3545.

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Date of creation: 2011
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Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_3545
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  1. Richard B. Freeman, 1994. "Crime and the Job Market," NBER Working Papers 4910, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. John Conlon & Mwangi Kimenyi, 1991. "Attitudes towards race and poverty in the demand for private education: The case of Mississippi," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer, vol. 20(2), pages 5-22, December.
  3. Nechyba, Thomas J., 2002. "School Finance, Spatial Income Segregation and the Nature of Communities," Working Papers 02-17, Duke University, Department of Economics.
  4. Benabou, R., 1999. "Tax and Education Policy in a Heterogeneous Agent Economy: What Levels of Redistribution Maximize Growth and Efficiency?," Working Papers 99-12, C.V. Starr Center for Applied Economics, New York University.
  5. Fairlie, Robert, 2014. "Is There "White Flight" into Private Schools? Evidence from the National Educational Longitudinal Survey," Santa Cruz Department of Economics, Working Paper Series qt1t22r4zp, Department of Economics, UC Santa Cruz.
  6. Leonid V. Azarnert, 2008. "Abortion and Human Capital Accumulation: A Contribution to the Understanding of the Gender Gap in Education," Working Papers 2008-06, Bar-Ilan University, Department of Economics.
  7. Caroline Hoxby, 2000. "Peer Effects in the Classroom: Learning from Gender and Race Variation," NBER Working Papers 7867, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Matthias Doepke & David de la Croix, 2004. "To segregate or to integrate: education politics and democracy," 2004 Meeting Papers 390, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  9. Dennis Epple & David Figlio & Richard Romano, 2000. "Competition Between Private and Public Schools: Testing Stratification and Pricing Predictions," NBER Working Papers 7956, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Leonid V. Azarnert, 2008. "Foreign Aid, Fertility and Human Capital Accumulation," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 75(300), pages 766-781, November.
  11. Oded_Galor, 2004. "From Stagnation to Growth:Unified Growth Theory," Working Papers 2004-15, Brown University, Department of Economics.
  12. Fairlie, Robert, 2014. "Does Immigration Induce "Native Flight" from Public Schools into Private Schools?," Santa Cruz Department of Economics, Working Paper Series qt85s5v99k, Department of Economics, UC Santa Cruz.
  13. Betts, Julian & Fairlie, Robert, 2000. "Explaining Ethnic, Racial, and Immigrant Differences in Private School Attendance," University of California at San Diego, Economics Working Paper Series qt9n44g161, Department of Economics, UC San Diego.
  14. Charles T. Clotfelter, 2001. "Are Whites Still Fleeing? Racial Patterns and Enrollment Shifts in Urban Public Schools, 1987-1996," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(2), pages 199-221.
  15. Card, David & Payne, A. Abigail, 2002. "School finance reform, the distribution of school spending, and the distribution of student test scores," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(1), pages 49-82, January.
  16. Leonid Azarnert, 2006. "Child mortality, fertility, and human capital accumulation," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 19(2), pages 285-297, June.
  17. Leonid Azarnert, 2010. "Free education, fertility and human capital accumulation," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 23(2), pages 449-468, March.
  18. Azarnert, L.V.Leonid V., 2004. "Redistribution, fertility, and growth: The effect of the opportunities abroad," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 48(4), pages 785-795, August.
  19. Leonid Azarnert, 2010. "Juvenile imprisonment and human capital investment," Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer, vol. 8(1), pages 23-33, March.
  20. Lankford, Hamilton & Wyckoff, James, 2001. "Who Would Be Left Behind by Enhanced Private School Choice?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(2), pages 288-312, September.
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