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International Capital Market Integration, Educational Choice and Economic Growth

Author

Listed:
  • Hartmut Egger
  • Peter Egger
  • Josef Falkinger
  • Volker Grossmann

Abstract

This paper examines the impact of capital market integration (CMI) on higher education and economic growth. We take into account that participation in higher education is non-compulsory and depends on individual choice. Integration increases (decreases) the incentives to participate in higher education in capital-importing (-exporting) economies, all other things equal. Increased participation in higher education enhances productivity progress and is accompanied by rising wage inequality. From a national policy point of view, education expenditure should increase after integration of similar economies. Using foreign direct investment (FDI) as a measure for capital flows, we present empirical evidence which largely confirms our main hypothesis: An increase in net capital inflows in response to CMI raises participation in higher education and thereby fosters economic growth. We apply a structural estimation approach to fully track the endogenous mechanisms of the model.

Suggested Citation

  • Hartmut Egger & Peter Egger & Josef Falkinger & Volker Grossmann, 2005. "International Capital Market Integration, Educational Choice and Economic Growth," CESifo Working Paper Series 1630, CESifo Group Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_1630
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Spiros Bougheas & Richard Kneller & Raymond Riezman, 2011. "Optimal Education Policies And Comparative Advantage," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 16(5), pages 538-552, December.
    2. repec:eur:ejmsjr:66 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Mazhar Yasin MUGHAL & Natalia VECHIU, 2010. "The role of Foreign Direct Investment in higher education in the developing countries (Does FDI promote education?)," Working Papers 2010-2011_10, CATT - UPPA - Université de Pau et des Pays de l'Adour, revised Nov 2010.
    4. repec:dau:papers:123456789/179 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    capital mobility; capital-skill complementarity educational choice; education policy; economic growth; wage income inequality;

    JEL classification:

    • F20 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - General
    • H52 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Education
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General

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