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The Impact of Capital Market Integration on Educational Choice and the Consequences for Economic Growth

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  • Hartmut Egger
  • Peter Egger
  • Josef Falkinger
  • Volker Grossmann

Abstract

Abstract This paper examines the impact of capital market integration on higher education and the link to economic growth. The analysis takes into account that participation in higher education is non-compulsory and depends on individual choice. Due to capital-skill complementarity, integration increases (reduces) the incentives to participate in higher education in capital-importing (-exporting) economies, all other things equal. From a national policy point of view, public education expenditure should increase after integration of similar economies in order to attract mobile capital. Using foreign direct investment as a measure of capital flows, we present empirical evidence which largely confirms our main hypothesis: an increase in net capital inflows in response to capital market integration raises participation in higher education. In addition, we show that the adjustment in educational attainment is an empirically relevant channel through which capital inflows foster economic growth. Copyright 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Hartmut Egger & Peter Egger & Josef Falkinger & Volker Grossmann, 2010. "The Impact of Capital Market Integration on Educational Choice and the Consequences for Economic Growth," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 33(10), pages 1241-1268, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:worlde:v:33:y:2010:i:10:p:1241-1268
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Volker Grossmann & David Stadelmann, 2012. "Does High-skilled Migration Affect Publicly Financed Investments?," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 20(5), pages 944-959, November.

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