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Trade, technology, and unemployment: the role of endogenous skill formation

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  • Udo Kreickemeier

Abstract

world, where the two countries (`Europe' and `America') differ in their preferences towards wage inequality. Fair wage considerations compress wage differentials in both countries. European workers are more averse to wage inequality, and Europe is characterized by lower wage differentials and higher unemployment. Allowing for endogenous skill formation, the effects of a globalization shock, global technological change, and a change in the educational capital stock on skill premia and employment levels are derived. In contrast to a model with exogenous factor supplies, international wage and unemployment differentials are affected by global shocks.

Suggested Citation

  • Udo Kreickemeier, 2009. "Trade, technology, and unemployment: the role of endogenous skill formation," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 42(2), pages 639-664, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:cje:issued:v:42:y:2009:i:2:p:639-664
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Sebastian Benz & Wilhelm Kohler, 2014. "Managerial versus Production Wages: Offshoring, Country Size, and Endowments," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 47(1), pages 250-271, February.
    2. Rossana Patron, 2013. "Recovery not fast enough? Notes on speeding up," Discussion Papers 13/06, University of Nottingham, School of Economics.
    3. Greenland, Andrew & Lopresti, John, 2016. "Import exposure and human capital adjustment: Evidence from the U.S," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 50-60.
    4. Falvey, Rod & Greenaway, David & Silva, Joana, 2010. "Trade liberalisation and human capital adjustment," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(2), pages 230-239, July.
    5. repec:bla:pacecr:v:21:y:2016:i:5:p:581-602 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Hartmut Egger & Peter Egger & Josef Falkinger & Volker Grossmann, 2010. "The Impact of Capital Market Integration on Educational Choice and the Consequences for Economic Growth," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 33(10), pages 1241-1268, October.
    7. Rossana PatrĂ³n, 2012. "Short-term specificity and training: Key issues for economic restructuring," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 0212, Department of Economics - dECON.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F11 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Neoclassical Models of Trade
    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration
    • F16 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Labor Market Interactions

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