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Computation of Business Cycle Models: A Comparison of Numerical Methods

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  • Burkhard Heer
  • Alfred Maussner

Abstract

We compare the numerical methods that are most widely applied in the computation of the standard business cycle model with flexible labor. The numerical techniques imply economically insignificant differences with regard to business cycle summary statistics except for the volatility of investment. Furthermore, these results are robust with regard to the choice of the functional form of the utility function and the model’s parameterization. In conclusion, the simplest and fastest method, the log-linearization of the model around the steady state, is found to be most convenient and appropriate for the standard business cycle model.

Suggested Citation

  • Burkhard Heer & Alfred Maussner, 2004. "Computation of Business Cycle Models: A Comparison of Numerical Methods," CESifo Working Paper Series 1207, CESifo Group Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_1207
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. David Domeij & Martin Floden, 2006. "The Labor-Supply Elasticity and Borrowing Constraints: Why Estimates are Biased," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 9(2), pages 242-262, April.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    log-linearization; projection methods; extended path; value function iteration; parameterized expectations; genetic search;

    JEL classification:

    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques
    • C68 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computable General Equilibrium Models
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles

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