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Granger Predictability of Oil Prices after the Great Recession

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  • Szilard Benk
  • Max Gillman

Abstract

Real oil prices surged from 2009 through 2014, comparable to the 1970's oil shock period. Standard explanations based on monopoly markup fall short since inflation remained low after 2009. This paper contributes strong evidence of Granger (1969) predictability of nominal factors to oil prices, using one adjustment to monetary aggregates. This adjustment is the subtraction from the monetary aggregates of the 2008-2009 Federal Reserve borrowing of reserves from other Central Banks (Swaps), made after US reserves turned negative. This adjustment is key in that Granger predictability from standard monetary aggregates is found only with the Swaps subtracted.

Suggested Citation

  • Szilard Benk & Max Gillman, 2019. "Granger Predictability of Oil Prices after the Great Recession," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp650, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
  • Handle: RePEc:cer:papers:wp650
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Emrah Ismail Cevik & Sel Dibooglu & Atif Awad Abdallah & Eisa Abdulrahman Al-Eisa, 2021. "Oil prices, stock market returns, and volatility spillovers: evidence from Saudi Arabia," International Economics and Economic Policy, Springer, vol. 18(1), pages 157-175, February.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    oil price shocks; Granger predictability; monetary base; M1 Divisia; Swaps; inflation;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • Q43 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy and the Macroeconomy
    • E51 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Money Supply; Credit; Money Multipliers
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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