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Happy Talk: Mode of Administration Effects on Subjective Well-Being

  • Paul Dolan
  • Georgios Kavetsos

Research on the measurement of subjective well-being (SWB) has escalated in recent years. This study contributes to the literature by examining how SWB reports differ by mode of survey administration. Using data from the 2011 Annual Population Survey in the UK, we find that individuals consistently report higher SWB over the phone compared to face-to-face interviews. We also show that the determinants of SWB differ significantly by survey mode. We must therefore account for mode of administration effects in research into SWB and its determinants.

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Paper provided by Centre for Economic Performance, LSE in its series CEP Discussion Papers with number dp1159.

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Date of creation: Jul 2012
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Handle: RePEc:cep:cepdps:dp1159
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/series.asp?prog=CEP

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