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The Evaluation of English Education Policies

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  • Stephen Machin
  • Sandra McNally

Abstract

Educational inequalities are evident even before children start school. Those connected to disadvantage widen out as children progress through the education system and into the labour market. We document various forms of educational inequality. We then review available evidence for England about the impact of school-level policies on achievement and their potential for reducing the socio-economic gap. We discuss evaluation evidence under four main themes: school resources; market incentives; school autonomy; and pedagogical approaches.

Suggested Citation

  • Stephen Machin & Sandra McNally, 2011. "The Evaluation of English Education Policies," CEE Discussion Papers 0131, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
  • Handle: RePEc:cep:ceedps:0131
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    File URL: http://cee.lse.ac.uk/ceedps/ceedp131.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gibbons, Steve & Machin, Stephen, 2003. "Valuing English primary schools," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(2), pages 197-219, March.
    2. Leslie Rosenthal, 2003. "The Value of Secondary School Quality," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 65(3), pages 329-355, July.
    3. Simon Burgess & Ellen Greaves & Anna Vignoles & Deborah Wilson, 2009. "Parental choice of primary school in England: what ‘type’ of school do parents choose?," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 09/224, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    4. Gibbons, Stephen & Machin, Stephen & Silva, Olmo, 2013. "Valuing school quality using boundary discontinuities," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 15-28.
    5. Stephen Machin & Sandra McNally & Costas Meghir, 2004. "Improving Pupil Performance in English Secondary Schools: Excellence in Cities," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 2(2-3), pages 396-405, 04/05.
    6. Steve Bradley & Jim Taylor, 2010. "Diversity, Choice and the Quasi-market: An Empirical Analysis of Secondary Education Policy in England," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 72(1), pages 1-26, February.
    7. Machin, Stephen, 2011. "Houses and schools: Valuation of school quality through the housing market," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(6), pages 723-729.
    8. Gibbons, Stephen & McNally, Sandra & Viarengo, Martina, 2011. "Does additional spending help urban schools? An evaluation using boundary discontinuities," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 44676, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    9. Machin, Stephen & McNally, Sandra, 2008. "The literacy hour," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(5-6), pages 1441-1462, June.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Richard B. Freeman & Martina Viarengo, 2014. "School and family effects on educational outcomes across countries," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 29(79), pages 395-446, July.
    2. Machin, Stephen & Wyness, Gill & McNally, Sandra, 2013. "Education in a devolved Scotland: a quantitative analysis," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 57971, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Nicholas Crafts, 2013. "Returning to Growth: Policy Lessons from History," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 34(2), pages 255-282, June.
    4. Steve Bradley & Giuseppe Migali, 2014. "The Effects of the Specialist Schools Education Policy on School and Post-School Outcomes in England," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 28(4), pages 449-465, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Educational inequality; evaluation; school policies;

    JEL classification:

    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education

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