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Parallel lives? Ethnic segregation in the playground and the neighbourhood

  • Simon Burgess
  • Ruth Lupton
  • Deborah Wilson

    ()

We provide evidence on the extent of ethnic segregation experienced by children across secondary schools and neighbourhoods (wards). Using 2001 Schools Census and Population Census data we employ the indices of dissimilarity and isolation and compare patterns of segregation across nine ethnic groups, and across Local Education Authorities in England. Looking at both schools and neighbourhoods, we find high levels of segregation for the different groups, along with considerable variation across England. We find consistently higher segregation for South Asian pupils than for Black pupils. For most ethnic groups children are more segregated in the playground than in their neighbourhood. We analyse the relative degree of segregation and show that high population density is associated with high relative school segregation.

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File URL: http://www.bris.ac.uk/Depts/CMPO/workingpapers/wp94.pdf
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Paper provided by Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK in its series The Centre for Market and Public Organisation with number 04/094.

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Length: 51 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:bri:cmpowp:04/094
Contact details of provider: Postal: 2 Priory Road, Bristol, BS8 1TX
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Web page: http://www.bris.ac.uk/cmpo/
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  1. Charles T. Clotfelter, 1999. "Public School Segregation in Metropolitan Areas," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 75(4), pages 487-504.
  2. Bayer, Patrick & McMillan, Robert & Rueben, Kim S., 2004. "What drives racial segregation? New evidence using Census microdata," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(3), pages 514-535, November.
  3. Cutler, David & Vigdor, Jacob & Glaeser, Edward, 1999. "The Rise and Decline of the American Ghetto," Scholarly Articles 2770033, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  4. Kenneth J. Arrow, 1998. "What Has Economics to Say about Racial Discrimination?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(2), pages 91-100, Spring.
  5. George J. Borjas, 1997. "To Ghetto or Not to Ghetto: Ethnicity and Residential Segregation," NBER Working Papers 6176, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Charles T. Clotfelter, 1998. "Public School Segregation in Metropolitan Areas," NBER Working Papers 6779, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Simon Burgess & Deborah Wilson, 2003. "Ethnic Segregation in England's Schools," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 03/086, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  8. Case, A.C. & Katz, L.F., 1991. "The Company You Keep: The Effects Of Family And Neighborhood On Disadvantaged Younths," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1555, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
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