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Are Schools Drifting Apart? Intake Stratification in English Secondary Schools

  • Steve Gibbons
  • Shqiponja Telhaj

The issue of social segregation in schools has seen a recent resurgence of interest - in the US, UK and internationally - as the debate rages on about whether policies that expand families' freedom to choose amongst schools encourage divergence or convergence in the types of pupil different schools admit. Most attention has been focussed on segregation along lines of ethnic or social background. Yet, the real consideration that seems to be in the back of most people's minds is the issue of segregation or stratification of schools along lines of pupil ability. We look explicitly at this issue using data on the population of pupils entering Secondary school in England from 1996 to 2002. Our study does highlight wide disparities between peer-group ability in different schools. But we also find that, contrary to popular opinion, almost nothing has changed over these years in terms of the way pupils of different age-11 abilities are sorted into different Secondary schools.

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File URL: http://cee.lse.ac.uk/ceedps/ceedp64.pdf
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Paper provided by Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE in its series CEE Discussion Papers with number 0064.

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Date of creation: Dec 2006
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Handle: RePEc:cep:ceedps:0064
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://cee.lse.ac.uk/publications.htm

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  1. Jonathan Guryan, 2001. "Desegregation and Black Dropout Rates," NBER Working Papers 8345, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Stephen Gibbons & Olmo Silva, 2007. "Urban density and pupil attainment," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 19393, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  3. Simon Burgess & Brendon McConnell & Carol Propper & Deborah Wilson, 2004. "Sorting and Choice in English Secondary Schools," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 04/111, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  4. David M. Cutler & Edward L. Glaeser & Jacob L. Vigdor, 1999. "The Rise and Decline of the American Ghetto," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(3), pages 455-506, June.
  5. Federico Echenique & Roland G. Fryer, Jr., 2005. "On the Measurement of Segregation," NBER Working Papers 11258, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Steve Gibbons & Olmo Silva, 2007. "Urban Density and Pupil Attainment," CEE Discussion Papers 0080, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
  7. Clotfelter, Charles T., 1998. "Public School Segregation in Metropolitan Areas," Working Papers 98-12, Duke University, Department of Economics.
  8. Simon Burgess & Deborah Wilson, 2003. "Ethnic Segregation in England's Schools," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 03/086, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  9. Gibbons, Steve & Machin, Stephen, 2003. "Valuing English primary schools," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(2), pages 197-219, March.
  10. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521793100 is not listed on IDEAS
  11. Charles T. Clotfelter & Jacob L. Vigdor & Helen F. Ladd, 2006. "Federal Oversight, Local Control, and the Specter of "Resegregation" in Southern Schools," American Law and Economics Review, Oxford University Press, vol. 8(2), pages 347-389.
  12. Stephen Gibbons & Stephen Machin, 2006. "Paying for Primary Schools: Admission Constraints, School Popularity or Congestion?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 116(510), pages C77-C92, 03.
  13. Steve Gibbons & Shqiponja Telhaj, 2006. "Peer Effects and Pupil Attainment: Evidence from Secondary School Transition," CEE Discussion Papers 0063, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
  14. Robert Hutchens, 2004. "One Measure of Segregation," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 45(2), pages 555-578, 05.
  15. Rebecca Allen & Anna Vignoles, 2006. "What Should an Index of School Segregation Measure?," CEE Discussion Papers 0060, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
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