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Tiebout choice and residential segregation by race in US metropolitan areas, 1980-2000


  • Dawkins, Casey J.


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  • Dawkins, Casey J., 2005. "Tiebout choice and residential segregation by race in US metropolitan areas, 1980-2000," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(6), pages 734-755, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:regeco:v:35:y:2005:i:6:p:734-755

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. William Frey & Reynolds Farley, 1996. "Latino, Asian, and black segregation in U.S. metropolitan areas: Are multiethnic metros different," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 33(1), pages 35-50, February.
    2. Fisher, Ronald C. & Wassmer, Robert W., 1998. "Economic Influences on the Structure of Local Government in U.S. Metropolitan Areas," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(3), pages 444-471, May.
    3. Caroline M. Hoxby, 2000. "Does Competition among Public Schools Benefit Students and Taxpayers?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(5), pages 1209-1238, December.
    4. Lambert, Peter J & Aronson, J Richard, 1993. "Inequality Decomposition Analysis and the Gini Coefficient Revisited," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 103(420), pages 1221-1227, September.
    5. Hausman, Jerry, 2015. "Specification tests in econometrics," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 38(2), pages 112-134.
    6. Martinez-Vazquez, Jorge & Rider, Mark & Walker, Mary Beth, 1997. "Race and the Structure of School Districts in the United States," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 281-300, March.
    7. Borjas, George J., 1998. "To Ghetto or Not to Ghetto: Ethnicity and Residential Segregation," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 228-253, September.
    8. Bayer, Patrick & McMillan, Robert & Rueben, Kim S., 2004. "What drives racial segregation? New evidence using Census microdata," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(3), pages 514-535, November.
    9. Hutchens, Robert, 2001. "Numerical measures of segregation: desirable properties and their implications," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 13-29, July.
    10. Gabriel, Stuart A & Rosenthal, Stuart S, 1989. "Household Location and Race: Estimates of Multinomial Logit Model," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 71(2), pages 240-249, May.
    11. Burstein, Nancy R., 1980. "Voluntary income clustering and the demand for housing and local public goods," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 175-185, March.
    12. Alberto Alesina & Reza Baqir & Caroline Hoxby, 2004. "Political Jurisdictions in Heterogeneous Communities," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 112(2), pages 348-396, April.
    13. W.Norton Grubb, 1982. "The Dynamic Implications of the Tiebout Model: the Changing Composition of Boston Communities, 1960-1970," Public Finance Review, , vol. 10(1), pages 17-38, January.
    14. David M. Cutler & Edward L. Glaeser, 1997. "Are Ghettos Good or Bad?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(3), pages 827-872.
    15. Yinger, John, 1976. "Racial prejudice and racial residential segregation in an urban model," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(4), pages 383-396, October.
    16. Ross, Stephen & Yinger, John, 1999. "Sorting and voting: A review of the literature on urban public finance," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics,in: P. C. Cheshire & E. S. Mills (ed.), Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 47, pages 2001-2060 Elsevier.
    17. Heikkila, Eric J., 1996. "Are municipalities Tieboutian clubs?," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 203-226, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Zeng, Dao-Zhi, 2008. "New economic geography with heterogeneous preferences: An explanation of segregation," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 306-324, January.
    2. José da Silva Costa & Ruben Fernandes & Ana Natálio, 2014. "Household Sorting and Politics: Empirical Evidence for the Metropolitan Area of Porto (Portugal)," FEP Working Papers 525, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.

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