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New economic geography with heterogeneous preferences: An explanation of segregation

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  • Zeng, Dao-Zhi

Abstract

The Tiebout hypothesis (residential choice depends solely on local public goods) is extensively applied to explain geographic segregation, and the related literature finds that residents are segregated according to their heterogeneous preferences for public goods. This paper further examines the heterogeneous preferences for private goods in a spatial economy without public goods. Specifically, we employ a new economic geography framework in which the heterogeneous preferences of mobile workers on manufactured goods are incorporated. The rigorous general equilibrium analysis conducted here shows that the increasing-returns technology and monopolistic competition form a mechanism endogenously leading to persistent residential segregation. There is an evolving path with decreasing transport costs in which the two types of mobile workers are segregated, while two industries evolve from dispersion to agglomeration.

Suggested Citation

  • Zeng, Dao-Zhi, 2008. "New economic geography with heterogeneous preferences: An explanation of segregation," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 306-324, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:juecon:v:63:y:2008:i:1:p:306-324
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    Cited by:

    1. Debra Hevenstone & Ben Jann, 2016. "Fiscal Federalism and Tax Equalization: The potential for progressive local taxes," University of Bern Social Sciences Working Papers 19, University of Bern, Department of Social Sciences.
    2. Amerighi, Oscar & Peralta, Susana, 2010. "The proximity-concentration trade-off with profit shifting," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 90-101, July.
    3. Fabien Candau & Marc Fleurbaey, 2011. "Agglomeration and Welfare with Heterogeneous Preferences," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 22(4), pages 685-708, September.
    4. Corey Lang, 2010. "Heterogeneous transport costs and spatial sorting in a model of New Economic Geography," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 89(1), pages 191-202, March.
    5. Fabien Candau, 2011. "Heterogeneous Immigration, Segregation and Trade," Review of Economics & Finance, Better Advances Press, Canada, vol. 1, pages 73-86, February.

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