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Public School Segregation in Metropolitan Areas

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  • Charles T. Clotfelter

Abstract

This paper presents measures of segregation in public schools for metropolitan areas. It shows that, not only are metropolitan areas very segregated, most of that segregation is due to racial disparities between districts rather than segregative patterns within districts. Metropolitan areas in the South and West tend to have larger districts, and thus feature less fragmentation by school district. Segregation at the metropolitan level appears to vary systematically with size, racial mix, and region. Because larger metropolitan areas tend to have more jurisdictions and exhibit greater differences in racial composition among jurisdictions, measured segregation rises with size, as measured by school enrollment.

Suggested Citation

  • Charles T. Clotfelter, 1998. "Public School Segregation in Metropolitan Areas," NBER Working Papers 6779, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:6779 Note: PE
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    1. Charles T. Clotfelter, 1978. "Alternative Measures of School Desegregation: A Methodological Note," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 54(3), pages 373-380.
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    Cited by:

    1. Miguel Urquiola & Eric Verhoogen, 2009. "Class-Size Caps, Sorting, and the Regression-Discontinuity Design," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(1), pages 179-215, March.
    2. Simon Burgess & Ruth Lupton & Deborah Wilson, 2005. "Parallel lives? Ethnic segregation in schools and neighbourhoods," CASE Papers 101, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.
    3. W. Bentley MacLeod & Miguel Urquiola, 2009. "Anti-Lemons: School Reputation and Educational Quality," NBER Working Papers 15112, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Charles T. Clotfelter, 1999. "Are Whites Still "Fleeing"? Racial Patterns and Enrollment Shifts in Urban Public Schools, 1987-1996," NBER Working Papers 7290, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Jonathan Guryan, 2004. "Desegregation and Black Dropout Rates," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(4), pages 919-943, September.
    6. Sean Reardon & John Yun & Tamela Eitle, 2000. "The changing structure of school segregation: Measurement and evidence of multiracial metropolitan-area school segregation, 1989–1995," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 37(3), pages 351-364, August.
    7. Simon Burgess & Brendon McConnell & Carol Propper & Deborah Wilson, 2004. "Sorting and Choice in English Secondary Schools," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 04/111, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    8. Simon Burgess & Ruth Lupton & Deborah Wilson, 2004. "Parallel lives? Ethnic segregation in the playground and the neighbourhood," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 04/094, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    9. Charles T. Clotfelter, 2000. "Interracial Contact in High School Extracurricular Activities," NBER Working Papers 7999, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. MacLeod, W. Bentley & Urquiola, Miguel, 2012. "Competition and Educational Productivity: Incentives Writ Large," IZA Discussion Papers 7063, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Charles T. Clotfelter, 2001. "Are Whites Still Fleeing? Racial Patterns and Enrollment Shifts in Urban Public Schools, 1987-1996," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(2), pages 199-221.
    12. Burgess, Simon & Wilson, Deborah & Lupton, Ruth, 2005. "Parallel lives? Ethnic segregation in schools and neighbourhoods," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 6255, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • R2 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis

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