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Efficient monitoring and control in intangibles-driven economies: is full independence always required?

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  • Y. Biondi
  • P. Giannoccolo
  • A. Reberioux

Abstract

The current crisis puts at issue the self-regulated market system of monitoring and control. Claims for restoring the proper functioning of market economies in general, and financial markets in particular, call for either establishing new sets of rules or creating new supervising authorities. Both claims rely on the received mantra of full independence that applies whenever control is concerned. However, our analysis pays attention to a neglected aspect of monitoring and control, which requires the capability to discovering and understanding flaws in and dangers from the inner congeries of the business affair under examination. Arguably, this business-specific expertise and independence trade off. To overcome this problem, an optimal share of non-independent controllers may be chosen from or appointed by stakeholding constituencies of the business affair. They can provide proficient monitoring and control without colluding, in principle, with executive managers of the activity to be controlled.

Suggested Citation

  • Y. Biondi & P. Giannoccolo & A. Reberioux, 2009. "Efficient monitoring and control in intangibles-driven economies: is full independence always required?," Working Papers 664, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
  • Handle: RePEc:bol:bodewp:664
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Sandra E. Black & Lisa M. Lynch, 2001. "How To Compete: The Impact Of Workplace Practices And Information Technology On Productivity," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 83(3), pages 434-445, August.
    2. Stephen D. Oliner & Daniel E. Sichel, 2000. "The Resurgence of Growth in the Late 1990s: Is Information Technology the Story?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(4), pages 3-22, Fall.
    3. Carol A. Corrado & Charles R. Hulten & Daniel E. Sichel, 2006. "Intangible Capital and Economic Growth," NBER Working Papers 11948, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Yuri Biondi & Vincent Bignon & Xavier Ragot, 2004. "An economic analysis of fair value : the evolution of accounting principles in European Legislation," Post-Print halshs-00203363, HAL.
    5. Kim, YoungGak, 2007. "A Survey on Intangible Capital," CEI Working Paper Series 2007-10, Center for Economic Institutions, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    6. Klein, April, 1998. "Firm Performance and Board Committee Structure," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 41(1), pages 275-303, April.
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