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Did pre-crisis mortgage lending limit post-crisis corporate lending? Evidence from UK bank balance sheets

Listed author(s):
  • Zhang, Lu

    ()

    (Sustainable Finance Lab, The Netherlands.)

  • Uluc, Arzu

    ()

    (Bank of England)

  • Bezemer, Dirk

    ()

    (Global Economics and Management, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.)

Was the bank credit crunch following the collapse of Lehman Brothers in September 2008 in many economies due to a loan supply collapse or to a decrease in loan demand? This paper investigates the effects of UK banks’ pre-crises exposure to residential property markets on their post-crisis business lending to explore the existence of a negative post-crisis loan supply shock. We isolate the loan supply effect from a loan demand effect by using a unique quasi-experimental setting and a rich, tailor-made micro-level data set on bank lending volumes, bank balance sheets and mortgage loan characteristics. Controlling for a range of bank-specific factors, we find that banks with larger shares of residential mortgages in total loans in 2008 Q2 reduced their lending to business more after 2008 Q3. Post-crisis lending to business is also sensitive to the riskiness of banks’ mortgage portfolios. Banks having more mortgages to borrowers with impaired credit history, or more mortgages to the self-employed, or mortgages with higher loan to value ratios prior to the crisis reduced their lending to non-financial businesses more.

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Paper provided by Bank of England in its series Bank of England working papers with number 651.

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Length: 33 pages
Date of creation: 03 Mar 2017
Handle: RePEc:boe:boeewp:0651
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