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The shift in bank credit allocation: new data and new findings

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  • Dirk Bezemer
  • Anna Samarina
  • Lu Zhang

Abstract

In this paper we present a new data set on bank credit in four categories: home mortgages, consumer credit, bank loans to non-bank financials, and loans to non- financial business, for 74 economies over 1990-2013. We offer a full description of sources and methods of data collection and construction and comparisons with adjacent data sets. We document key trends including the shift in bank credit allocation away from traditional business lending. The literature suggests substantial consequences of this 'debt shift' for growth, income distribution and macroeconomic resilience, which motivated this data construction. A second contribution is to analyze drivers of debt shift in fixed-effects and system-GMM regressions for the full sample and separately for advanced and emerging economies. We find that debt shift is larger in advanced economies with a stronger presence of foreign banks and higher trade. Financial deregulation strongly correlates with debt shift.

Suggested Citation

  • Dirk Bezemer & Anna Samarina & Lu Zhang, 2017. "The shift in bank credit allocation: new data and new findings," DNB Working Papers 559, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:dnb:dnbwpp:559
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    Cited by:

    1. Dirk Bezemer & Anna Samarina, 2019. "Debt shift, financial development and income inequality," DNB Working Papers 646, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    2. Stockhammer, Engelbert & Wildauer, Rafael, 2018. "Expenditure Cascades, Low Interest Rates or Property Booms? Determinants of Household Debt in OECD Countries," Review of Behavioral Economics, now publishers, vol. 5(2), pages 85-121, September.
    3. Jakab, Zoltan & Kumhof, Michael, 2018. "Banks are not intermediaries of loanable funds — facts, theory and evidence," Bank of England working papers 761, Bank of England.
    4. repec:eee:jimfin:v:77:y:2017:i:c:p:77-98 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Braun, Benjamin & Deeg, Richard, 2019. "Strong firms, weak banks: The financial consequences of Germany's export-led growth model," MPIfG Discussion Paper 19/5, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies.
    6. Ekinci, Mehmet Fatih & Omay, Tolga, 2019. "Current Account and Credit Growth: The Role of Household Credit and Financial Depth," MPRA Paper 93882, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    credit allocation; business lending; household mortgage;

    JEL classification:

    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E51 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Money Supply; Credit; Money Multipliers
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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