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Capital Flows and Financial Stability in Emerging Economies

Author

Listed:
  • Christopher F. Baum

    () (Boston College
    DIW Berlin)

  • Madhavi Pundit

    () (Asian Development Bank)

  • Arief Ramayandi

    () (Asian Development Bank)

Abstract

There is mixed evidence for the impact of international capital flows on financial sector's stability. This paper investigates the relationship between components of gross capital flows and various financial stability indicators for 16 emerging and newly industrialized economies. Departing from panel data methods, for each financial stability proxy, we employ systems of seemingly unrelated regression estimators to allow variation in the estimated relationship across countries, while permitting crossequation restrictions to be imposed within a country. The findings suggest that, after controlling for macroeconomic factors, there are significant effects of different gross capital flow measures on the financial stability proxies. However, the effects are not homogeneous across our sample economies and across flows. Country-specific financial and macroeconomic characteristics help to explain some of these differences.

Suggested Citation

  • Christopher F. Baum & Madhavi Pundit & Arief Ramayandi, 2017. "Capital Flows and Financial Stability in Emerging Economies," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 936, Boston College Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:boc:bocoec:936
    Note: This paper was first circulated by the Asian Development Bank as ADB Economics Working Paper 522
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Selin Sayek & Alexander Lehmann & Hyoung Goo Kang, 2004. "Multinational Affiliates and Local Financial Markets," IMF Working Papers 04/107, International Monetary Fund.
    2. Gian‐Maria Milesi‐Ferretti & Cédric Tille, 2011. "The great retrenchment: international capital flows during the global financial crisis," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 26(66), pages 285-342, April.
    3. Paolo Mauro, 2007. "Do Some Forms of Financial Flows Help Protect Against "Sudden Stops"?," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 21(3), pages 389-411, September.
    4. Wei, Shang-Jin, 2001. "Domestic Crony Capitalism and International Fickle Capital: Is There a Connection?," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 4(1), pages 15-45, Spring.
    5. Carmen M. Reinhart & Graciela L. Kaminsky, 1999. "The Twin Crises: The Causes of Banking and Balance-of-Payments Problems," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(3), pages 473-500, June.
    6. Maria Sole Pagliari & Swarnali Ahmed Hannan, 2017. "The Volatility of Capital Flows in Emerging Markets; Measures and Determinants," IMF Working Papers 17/41, International Monetary Fund.
    7. Sula, Ozan & Willett, Thomas D., 2009. "The reversibility of different types of capital flows to emerging markets," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 10(4), pages 296-310, December.
    8. Paolo Mauro & Andrei A Levchenko, 2006. "Do Some Forms of Financial Flows Help Protect From Sudden Stops?," IMF Working Papers 06/202, International Monetary Fund.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    emerging economies; financial stability; international capital flows;

    JEL classification:

    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics

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