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Net interoffice accounts of global banks: the role of domestic funding

  • D’Avino, C.
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    Using US banks' balance sheet data, this paper examines the responsiveness of net interoffice accounts, that is, the net liabilities of parent offices due to their foreign-related offices, to variations in different types of domestic funding. Furthermore, it investigates whether the relationship between net interoffice accounts and domestic policy-steered rates depends on cross-sectional differences in the funding structure of global banks. Estimation results suggest that domestic interbank and repo borrowings are important drivers of net interoffice accounts, the latter being significant during the crisis period. A negative relationship between policy rates and net interoffice accounts is observed only for those global banks with a relatively higher share of repo borrowings.

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    Paper provided by Banque de France in its series Working papers with number 448.

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    Length: 24 pages
    Date of creation: 2013
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:bfr:banfra:448
    Contact details of provider: Postal: Banque de France 31 Rue Croix des Petits Champs LABOLOG - 49-1404 75049 PARIS
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