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Italian workers at risk during the COVID-19 epidemic

Author

Listed:
  • Teresa Barbieri

    (INAPP)

  • Gaetano Basso

    (Bank of Italy)

  • Sergio Scicchitano

    (INAPP)

Abstract

We analyse the content of Italian occupations operating in about 600 sectors with a focus on the dimensions that expose workers to risks during the COVID-19 epidemics. We leverage detailed information from ICP, the Italian equivalent of O*Net and find that several sectors need physical proximity to operate: the workers employed in sectors whose physical proximity index is above the national average are more than 6.5 million (mostly in retail trade). Groups at risk of complications from COVID-19 (mainly male above the age of 50) work in sectors that are little exposed to physical proximity, currently under lockdown or can work remotely. The sectoral lockdowns put in place by the Italian Government in March 2020 targeted sectors who operate in physical proximity, but not those directly exposed to infections (the health industry is not subject to lockdown). Most of the workforce who can operate from home have not been put under lockdown.

Suggested Citation

  • Teresa Barbieri & Gaetano Basso & Sergio Scicchitano, 2020. "Italian workers at risk during the COVID-19 epidemic," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 569, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  • Handle: RePEc:bdi:opques:qef_569_20
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    working conditions; safety; crisis policies; COVID-19 epidemics;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J28 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Safety; Job Satisfaction; Related Public Policy
    • J81 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Standards - - - Working Conditions
    • H12 - Public Economics - - Structure and Scope of Government - - - Crisis Management
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health

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