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Fiscal Perspective of State Rescaling

Recent socio-spatial studies point out a number of ongoing trends in the “scale division of labor of the state,” including among others, “destatization,” "denationalization, and “internationalization.” We draw on the literature in public economics to review several approaches to measuring state rescaling. We employ these measures to produce empirical evidence on the extent of state rescaling and its determinants. We find that over the last two decades there has been a world trend towards decentralization while the average government size has not changed.

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File URL: http://icepp.gsu.edu/files/2015/03/ispwp0806.pdf
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Paper provided by International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University in its series International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU with number paper0806.

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Length: 47 pages
Date of creation: 01 Dec 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ays:ispwps:paper0806
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Web page: http://aysps.gsu.edu/isp/index.html

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  18. Oates, Wallace E, 1985. "Searching for Leviathan: An Empirical Study," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(4), pages 748-57, September.
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