IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Who Cites What?

  • Kenneth W. Clements
  • Patricia Wang

PhD students have the talent and incentives to identify important, emerging areas in their research. As many of these students will go on to academic careers, this paper uses the citations patterns embodied in their research as a possible leading indicator of what the future may hold in economics and business. We identify areas, articles and authors that PhD students judge to be important and analyse intriguing empirical regularities regarding the citation of Australian publications, reciprocal citations among institutions, the link between institutional size and citations, and the age of publications when cited.

(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL:
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 442.

in new window

Length: 49 pages
Date of creation: Dec 2001
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:auu:dpaper:442
Contact details of provider: Postal: +61 2 6125 3807
Phone: +61 2 6125 3807
Fax: +61 2 6125 0744
Web page:

More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Stigler, George J & Friedland, Claire, 1975. "The Citation Practices of Doctorates in Economics," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 83(3), pages 477-507, June.
  2. Laband, David N & Piette, Michael J, 1994. "The Relative Impacts of Economics Journals: 1970-1990," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 32(2), pages 640-66, June.
  3. Sinha, Dipendra & Macri, Joseph, 2002. "Rankings of Australian Economics Departments, 1988-2000," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 78(241), pages 136-46, June.
  4. Daranee Chenhall & Kenneth W. Clements, 1995. "THE PRODUCTION OF PhDs IN ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS BY AUSTRALIAN UNIVERSITIES," Economic Papers, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 14(2), pages 49-66, 06.
  5. Qiang, Ye & Clements, Kenneth W, 1999. "Ten Years of the PHD Conference in Economics and Business," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 75(230), pages 301-12, September.
  6. Towe, Jack B & Wright, Donald J, 1995. "Research Published by Australian Economics and Econometrics Departments: 1988-93," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 71(212), pages 8-17, March.
  7. Arthur M. Diamond Jr., 1986. "What is a Citation Worth?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 21(2), pages 200-215.
  8. Quandt, Richard E, 1976. "Some Quantitative Aspects of the Economics Journal Literature," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 84(4), pages 741-55, August.
  9. Eagly, Robert V, 1975. "Economics Journals as a Communications Network," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 13(3), pages 878-88, September.
  10. Peter Groenewegen & Susan King, 1998. "Voices From The Journals: Women Contributors To Four Australian Economic Periodicals: 1925/1996," Economic Papers, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 17(1), pages 13-31, 03.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:auu:dpaper:442. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: ()

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.