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Global Warming and German Agriculture

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Abstract

This study uses the concept of shadow prices for measuring the impacts of climate change. Estimation of a restricted profit function rather than a cost or a production function increases the explanatory power of the agroclimate approach because of an endogenous output structure. Using micro-based panel data on Western German farmers, the results im-ply that the agricul-tural production process is significantly influenced by climate conditions. By linking this model with a climate-change scenario, a remarkable positive shadow value is found for the German agricultural sector. Interestingly, the spatial distribution of the gains shows no concentration on those regions, which currently suffer from insufficient temperature. Finally, the importance of an endogenous output structure is confirmed by the finding that the de-sired product mix will drastically change.

Suggested Citation

  • Guenter Lang, 1999. "Global Warming and German Agriculture," Discussion Paper Series 185, Universitaet Augsburg, Institute for Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:aug:augsbe:0185
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mendelsohn, Robert & Nordhaus, William D & Shaw, Daigee, 1994. "The Impact of Global Warming on Agriculture: A Ricardian Analysis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(4), pages 753-771, September.
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    3. Beach, Robert H. & Thomson, Allison M. & McCarl, Bruce A., 2010. "Climate Change Impacts On Us Agriculture," 2010: Climate Change in World Agriculture: Mitigation, Adaptation, Trade and Food Security, June 2010, Stuttgart-Hohenheim, Germany 91393, International Agricultural Trade Research Consortium.
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    6. Dixon, Bruce L. & Hollinger, Steven E. & Garcia, Philip & Tirupattur, Viswanath, 1994. "Estimating Corn Yield Response Models To Predict Impacts Of Climate Change," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 19(1), pages 1-11, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Martina Bozzola & Emanuele Massetti & Robert Mendelsohn & Fabian Capitanio, 2018. "A Ricardian analysis of the impact of climate change on Italian agriculture," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 45(1), pages 57-79.
    2. Molinos-Senante, María & Hanley, Nick & Sala-Garrido, Ramón, 2015. "Measuring the CO2 shadow price for wastewater treatment: A directional distance function approach," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 144(C), pages 241-249.
    3. Colin R. Jackson & Bram W. G. Stone & Heather L. Tyler, 2015. "Emerging Perspectives on the Natural Microbiome of Fresh Produce Vegetables," Agriculture, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(2), pages 1-18, April.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets
    • Q25 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Water

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