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Oyster Demand Adjustments to Counter-Information and Source Treatments in Response to Vibrio vulnificus

  • O. Ashton Morgan
  • Gregory S. Martin
  • William L. Huth

A web-based contingent behavior analysis is developed to quantity the effect of both negative and positive information treatments and post harvest processes (PHP) on demand for oysters. Results from a panel model indicate that consumers of raw and cooked oysters behave differently after news of an oyster-related human mortality. While cooked oyster consumers take precautionary measures against risk, raw oyster consumers exhibit optimistic bias and increase their consumption level. Further, by varying the source of a counter-information treatment, we find that source credibility impacts behavior. Oyster consumers, and in particular, raw oyster consumers, are most responsive to information provided by a not-for-profit, non-governmental organization. Finally, post harvest processing of oysters has no impact on demand. Key Words: Oyster demand; consumer behavior; non-market valuation; Vibrio vulnificus; information treatments; source credibility; optimistic bias

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File URL: http://econ.appstate.edu/RePEc/pdf/wp0908.pdf
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Paper provided by Department of Economics, Appalachian State University in its series Working Papers with number 09-08.

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Date of creation: 2009
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Handle: RePEc:apl:wpaper:09-08
Contact details of provider: Postal: Thelma C. Raley Hall, Boone, North Carolina 28608
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Web page: http://www.business.appstate.edu/departments/economics/

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  1. Johnston, Robert J. & Roheim, Cathy A. & Donath, Holger & Asche, Frank, 2001. "Measuring Consumer Preferences For Ecolabeled Seafood: An International Comparison," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 26(01), July.
  2. Huffman, Wallace & Rousu, Matthew & Shogren, Jason F. & Tegene, Abebayehu, 2002. "Who Do Consumers Trust for Information? The Case of Genetically Modified Foods," Staff General Research Papers 10061, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  3. Parsons, George R. & Morgan, Ash & Whitehead, John C. & Haab, Timothy C., 2006. "The Welfare Effects of Pfiesteria-Related Fish Kills: A Contingent Behavior Analysis of Seafood Consumers," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 35(2), October.
  4. Creel, Michael D & Loomis, John B, 1991. "Confidence Intervals for Welfare Measures with Application to a Problem of Truncated Counts," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 73(2), pages 370-73, May.
  5. James Murphy & P. Allen & Thomas Stevens & Darryl Weatherhead, 2005. "A Meta-analysis of Hypothetical Bias in Stated Preference Valuation," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 30(3), pages 313-325, 03.
  6. George R. Parsons & Ash O. Morgan & John C. Whitehead & Timothy C. Haab, 2005. "The Welfare Effects of Pfiesteria-Related Fish Kills in Seafood Markets: A Contingent Behavior Analysis," Working Papers 05-01, Department of Economics, Appalachian State University.
  7. Herriges, Joseph A. & Kling, Catherine L., 1999. "Valuing Recreation and the Environment: Revealed Preference Methods in Theory and Practice, New Horizons in Environmental Economics," Staff General Research Papers 12330, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  8. Egan, Kevin J. & Herriges, Joseph A., 2006. "Multivariate Count Data Regression Models with Individual Panel Data from an On-Site Sample," Staff General Research Papers 12573, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  9. Huffman, Wallace E. & Tegene, Abebayehu, 2002. "Public Acceptance of and Benefits from Agricultural Biotechnology: A Key Role for Verifiable Information," Staff General Research Papers 10435, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  10. Nicholas E. Piggott & Thomas L. Marsh, 2004. "Does Food Safety Information Impact U.S. Meat Demand?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 86(1), pages 154-174.
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