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Minimum wage workers in the private sector in Poland: regional perspective

Author

Listed:
  • Aleksandra Majchrowska

    (University of Lodz)

  • Pawe³ Strawiñski

    (University of Warsaw)

Abstract

The aim of the paper is to analyse regional diversification of minimum wage workers in the private sector in Poland and identify regions more vulnerable to minimum wage increases. Firstly, we examine the regional differences in the share of minimum wage workers. Secondly, we look at the structure of minimum wage earners. Finally, we use empirical approach analogous to Nestiæ et al. (2018) to identify low-wage sections and low-wage regions. We use individual data from the Structure of Earnings Survey in Poland. The research period covers 2008-2016. Six Polish regions are identified as the low-wage ones: five economically underdeveloped provinces of Eastern Poland and one region located centrally. These regions are characterised not only by high percentage of young people working for the minimum wage, but also high share of prime age and elderly minimum wage workers. High share of minimum wage earners is not only among low-qualified workers, but also among those with secondary education. These are employed in labour intensive, low-wage sections of the economy. What is particularly interesting is the fact that the results are fairly stable over time. To the best of our knowledge this is the first study of such kind not only for Poland but also for other countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Aleksandra Majchrowska & Pawe³ Strawiñski, 2019. "Minimum wage workers in the private sector in Poland: regional perspective," Lodz Economics Working Papers 1/2019, University of Lodz, Faculty of Economics and Sociology.
  • Handle: RePEc:ann:wpaper:2/2019
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/11089/28286
    File Function: First version, 2019
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    minimum wage; minimum wage workers; low-wage sectors; low-wage regions; Poland;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J82 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Standards - - - Labor Force Composition

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