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Modelling Possible Impacts of GM Crops on Australian Trade

Author

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  • Stone, Susan F.
  • Matysek, Anna
  • Dolling, Andrew

Abstract

"Modelling Possible Impacts of GM Crops on Australian Trade" by Susan Stone, Anna Matysek and Andrew Dolling was released on 8 November 2002. The paper provides an analysis of the economic and trade implications of the introduction of GM technology in the grains, excluding wheat and oilseeds, sectors. It contains a detailed review of the evidence of the on-farm benefits achieved from the main GM crops commercialised to date. It assesses the consumer and regulatory environments in which GM crops are being introduced, including any associated costs. As well the paper models, using the general equilibrium model GTAP, the trade implications for Australia, and its main trading partners, of the introduction of GM oilseeds and grains under different domestic and international regulatory and consumer response scenarios. The views expressed in this paper are those of the staff involved and do not necessarily reflect those of the Productivity Commission.

Suggested Citation

  • Stone, Susan F. & Matysek, Anna & Dolling, Andrew, 2002. "Modelling Possible Impacts of GM Crops on Australian Trade," Staff Research Papers 31913, Productivity Commission.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:prodsr:31913
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mayer, Holly & Furtan, W. H., 1999. "Economics of transgenic herbicide-tolerant canola: The case of western Canada," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 431-442, August.
    2. Fernandez-Cornejo, Jorge & McBride, William D., 2000. "Genetically Engineered Crops For Pest Management In U.S. Agriculture," Agricultural Economics Reports 33931, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    3. Bullock, D. S. & Desquilbet, M., 2002. "The economics of non-GMO segregation and identity preservation," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 81-99, February.
    4. Fernandez-Cornejo, Jorge & McBride, William D., 2002. "Adoption Of Bioengineered Crops," Agricultural Economics Reports 33957, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    5. Senauer, Benjamin, 2001. "The Food Consumer In The 21st Century: New Research Perspectives," Working Papers 14346, University of Minnesota, The Food Industry Center.
    6. Zilberman, David & Yarkin, Cherisa & Heiman, Amir, 1997. "Agricultural Biotechnology: Economic and International Implications," 1997 Conference, August 10-16, 1997, Sacramento, California 197037, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
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    Cited by:

    1. Chantal Pohl Nielsen & Kym Anderson, 2003. "Golden Rice and the Looming GMO Trade Debate: Implication for the Poor," Centre for International Economic Studies Working Papers 2003-22, University of Adelaide, Centre for International Economic Studies.
    2. Anderson, Kym & Jackson, Lee Ann, 2005. "GM crop technology and trade restraints: economic implications for Australia and New Zealand," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 49(3), September.
    3. Anderson, Kym & Jackson, Lee Ann, 2004. "Standards, Trade And Protection: The Case Of Gmos," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 20282, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    4. Kym Anderson & Lee Ann Jacskon, 2004. "GM Food Crop Technology and Trade Measures: Some Economic Implications for Australia and New Zealand," Centre for International Economic Studies Working Papers 2004-08, University of Adelaide, Centre for International Economic Studies.
    5. Chetvertakov, S., 2016. "Welfare Analysis of Lifting the GM Ban in Russia," AGRIS on-line Papers in Economics and Informatics, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Faculty of Economics and Management, vol. 8(2), June.
    6. Miller, Andrew D. & Langley, Suchada V. & Chambers, William, 2003. "Current Issues Affecting Trade And Trade Policy: An Annotated Literature Review," Working Papers 14606, International Agricultural Trade Research Consortium.
    7. Jackson, Lee Ann & Anderson, Kym, 2003. "WHY ARE US AND EU POLICIES TOWARD GMOs SO DIFFERENT?," 2003 Conference (47th), February 12-14, 2003, Fremantle, Australia 57898, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    8. Anderson, Kym & Jackson, Lee Ann, 2004. "GM food technology abroad and its implications for Australia and New Zealand," 2004 Conference (48th), February 11-13, 2004, Melbourne, Australia 58365, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    9. Crowe, Bronwyn & Pluske, Johanna M., 2006. "Is it Cost Effective to Segregate Canola in WA?," Australasian Agribusiness Review, University of Melbourne, Melbourne School of Land and Environment, vol. 14.
    10. Taing, William & Ahmadi-Esfahani, Fredoun Z., 2009. "GM technology and the Australian canola," 2009 Conference (53rd), February 11-13, 2009, Cairns, Australia 48191, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    11. Kaye-Blake, William & Saunders, Caroline M. & Fairweather, John, 2005. "Optimal uptake of second-generation genetically-modified crops," 2005 Conference (49th), February 9-11, 2005, Coff's Harbour, Australia 137932, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    12. Kaye-Blake, William & Saunders, Caroline M., 2006. "Estimated Contribution of Four Biotechnologies to New Zealand Agriculture," 2006 Annual meeting, July 23-26, Long Beach, CA 21133, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).

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    Keywords

    International Relations/Trade;

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