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Analysis of Beef Value Chain in Zambia: Challenges and Opportunities of Linking Smallholders to Markets

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  • Lubungu, Mary
  • Sitko, Nicholas J.
  • Hichaambwa, Munguzwe

Abstract

Rapid urbanization and population expansion, coupled with sustained income growth and the emergence of an urban African middle class are triggering an increase in the consumption of animal protein in Zambia. The sustained increase in the consumption of animal proteins creates a host of new development opportunities to synergistically link small-scale livestock producers into economic growth processes from which they have largely been excluded.

Suggested Citation

  • Lubungu, Mary & Sitko, Nicholas J. & Hichaambwa, Munguzwe, 2015. "Analysis of Beef Value Chain in Zambia: Challenges and Opportunities of Linking Smallholders to Markets," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 229599, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:midcwp:229599
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.229599
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    File URL: https://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/229599/files/wp103.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David Tschirley & Thomas Reardon & Michael Dolislager & Jason Snyder, 2015. "The Rise of a Middle Class in East and Southern Africa: Implications for Food System Transformation," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(5), pages 628-646, July.
    2. Nigel Key & Elisabeth Sadoulet & Alain De Janvry, 2000. "Transactions Costs and Agricultural Household Supply Response," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 82(2), pages 245-259.
    3. Seale, James L., Jr. & Regmi, Anita & Bernstein, Jason, 2003. "International Evidence On Food Consumption Patterns," Technical Bulletins 33580, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    4. Seale, James L., Jr. & Regmi, Anita & Bernstein, Jason, 2003. "International Evidence On Food Consumption Patterns," Technical Bulletins 33580, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    5. Lapar, M. L. & Holloway, G. & Ehui, S., 2003. "Policy options promoting market participation among smallholder livestock producers: a case study from the Phillipines," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 187-211, June.
    6. Muhammad, Andrew & Meade, Birgit Gisela Saager & Regmi, Anita & Seale, James L., 2011. "International Evidence on Food Consumption Patterns: An Update Using 2005 International Comparison Program Data," Technical Bulletins 120252, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    7. Hichaambwa, Munguzwe, 2012. "Urban Consumption Patterns of Livestock Products in Zambia and Implications for Policy," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 132343, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    8. N.P. Sikhweni & R. Hassan, 2014. "Determinants of herd size among small-scale cattle farmers: the case of selected villages at the Mhinga Traditional Authority in Limpopo, South Africa," Agrekon, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 53(4), pages 106-122, November.
    9. Muhammad, Andrew & Meade, Birgit Gisela Saager, 2011. "International Evidence on Food Consumption Patterns: An Update Using 2005 International Comparison Program Data," Technical Bulletins 120252, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lubungu, Mary, 2016. "Zambian Smallholder Livestock Herd Dynamics: What Are the Policy Implications?," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 249693, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.

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    Keywords

    Livestock Production/Industries;

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