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Food Crop Marketing and Agricultural Productivity in a High Price Environment: Evidence and Implications for Mozambique

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  • Benfica, Rui M.S.
  • Boughton, Duncan
  • Mouzinho, Bordalo
  • Uaiene, Rafael

Abstract

This paper assesses the relationship between agricultural productivity and market participation and performance following an increase in market prices in Mozambique. We use panel data before and after the change in price regime to identify the relative importance of market access/participation versus household and farm-level factors in explaining productivity differences. Conversely, we look at the relative importance of productivity investments and outcomes versus marketing investments in explaining household market performance. We find that between 2008, before the price increases, and 2011, there were increases in market participation rates and in the intensity of participation. Modest increases are also found in terms of productivity for all crop groups.

Suggested Citation

  • Benfica, Rui M.S. & Boughton, Duncan & Mouzinho, Bordalo & Uaiene, Rafael, 2014. "Food Crop Marketing and Agricultural Productivity in a High Price Environment: Evidence and Implications for Mozambique," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 176722, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:midcwp:176722
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/176722
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Rios, Ana R. & Masters, William A. & Shively, Gerald E., 2008. "Linkages between Market Participation and Productivity: Results from a Multi-Country Farm Household Sample," 2008 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2008, Orlando, Florida 6145, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    2. Govereh, Jones & Jayne, Thomas S., 1999. "Effects of Cash Crop Production on Food Crop Productivity in Zimbabwe: Synergies or Trade-offs?," Food Security International Development Working Papers 54670, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    3. Mather, David & Boughton, Duncan & Jayne, T.S., 2013. "Explaining smallholder maize marketing in southern and eastern Africa: The roles of market access, technology and household resource endowments," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 248-266.
    4. Udry, Christopher, 2010. "The economics of agriculture in Africa: Notes toward a research program," African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, African Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 5(1), September.
    5. Kamara, Abdul B., 2004. "The impact of market access on input use and agricultural productivity: Evidence from Machakos District, Kenya," Agrekon, Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA), vol. 43(2), June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Antonio S. Cruz & Fausto J. Mafambissa, 2016. "Industries without smokestacks: Mozambique country case study," WIDER Working Paper Series 158, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. Grabowski, Philip & Kerr, John & Donovan, Cynthia & Mouzinho, Bordalo, 2015. "A Prospective Analysis of Participatory Research on Conservation Agriculture in Mozambique," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 198703, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Agricultural and Food Policy; Food Security and Poverty; International Development; Marketing; Production Economics; Productivity Analysis; Research Methods/ Statistical Methods;

    JEL classification:

    • C31 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models; Quantile Regressions; Social Interaction Models
    • C36 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Instrumental Variables (IV) Estimation
    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation

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