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Impacts of Paving Roads for Development in the Democratic Republic of Congo: Deforestation and Biological Carbon Loss

Listed author(s):
  • Li, Man
  • De Pinto, Alessandro
  • Ulimwengu, John M.
  • You, Liangzhi
  • Robertson, Richard D.

This paper develops an econometric model to explore the determinants of land use choices for the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The model is not just capable of representing land use choices using large aggregation categories, but it also allocates agricultural area to the country relevant crops by augmenting the dataset with low-cost, widely available, agricultural statistics about crop areas and production. This is important to decision makers who want to plan for economic growth while trying to minimize greenhouse gas emissions. An empirical application indicates that the implementation of an ongoing government’s plan for road construction in the country would cause a reduction of about 2% of the existing standing forest stock, and a loss in biological carbon stock estimated to be 294 TgC. Encroachment of agriculture into forested land would contribute to the reduction in biological carbon stock by an estimated 112 TgC and would generate annual emissions estimated to be 21 thousand Mg CO2e with low nitrogen application or 300 thousand Mg CO2e from high nitrogen application.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/126672
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Paper provided by International Association of Agricultural Economists in its series 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil with number 126672.

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Date of creation: Aug 2012
Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae12:126672
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.iaae-agecon.org/
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  1. Schatzki, Todd, 2003. "Options, uncertainty and sunk costs:: an empirical analysis of land use change," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 86-105, July.
  2. Gerald C. Nelson & Daniel Hellerstein, 1997. "Do Roads Cause Deforestation? Using Satellite Images in Econometric Analysis of Land Use," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(1), pages 80-88.
  3. Alessandro Pinto & Gerald C. Nelson, 2009. "Land Use Change with Spatially Explicit Data: A Dynamic Approach," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 43(2), pages 209-229, June.
  4. Edward B. Barbier & Joanne C. Burgess, 1997. "The Economics of Tropical Forest Land Use Options," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 73(2), pages 174-195.
  5. Cropper, Maureen & Griffiths, Charles, 1994. "The Interaction of Population Growth and Environmental Quality," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(2), pages 250-254, May.
  6. Lubowski, Ruben N. & Plantinga, Andrew J. & Stavins, Robert N., 2006. "Land-use change and carbon sinks: Econometric estimation of the carbon sequestration supply function," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 135-152, March.
  7. Alessandro De Pinto & Gerald C. Nelson, 2007. "Modelling Deforestation and Land-Use Change: Sparse Data Environments," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(3), pages 502-516, 09.
  8. Bruce, John W., 1998. "Country Profiles Of Land Tenure: Africa, 1996," Research Papers 12759, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Land Tenure Center.
  9. Karen C. Seto & Robert K. Kaufmann, 2003. "Modeling the Drivers of Urban Land Use Change in the Pearl River Delta, China: Integrating Remote Sensing with Socioeconomic Data," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 79(1), pages 106-121.
  10. Pfaff, Alexander S. P., 1999. "What Drives Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon?: Evidence from Satellite and Socioeconomic Data," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 26-43, January.
  11. Kenneth M. Chomitz & Timothy S. Thomas, 2003. "Determinants of Land Use in Amazônia: A Fine-Scale Spatial Analysis," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(4), pages 1016-1028.
  12. Klaus Deininger & Bart Minten, 2002. "Determinants of Deforestation and the Economics of Protection: An Application to Mexico," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 84(4), pages 943-960.
  13. Ulimwengu, John & Funes, Jose & Headey, Derek & You, Liangzhi, 2009. "Paving the way for development?: The impact of transport infrastructure on agricultural production and poverty reduction in the Democratic Republic of Congo," IFPRI discussion papers 944, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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